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Nuclear Threats 75 Years After Hiroshima

Former deputy secretary of energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall and Stanford University’s Scott Sagan examine nuclear weapons today and what Americans can do as arms control regimes falter.
Left: Mushroom cloud over Hiroshima; Right: Atomic Cloud Rises Over Nagasaki
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August 6 marks the 75th anniversary of the first time nuclear weapons were used in combat, when the United States bombed Hiroshima and later, Nagasaki. Former deputy secretary of energy Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall and Stanford University’s Scott Sagan join Deep Dish to examine nuclear weapons today and what Americans can do as arms control regimes falter, modernization programs move forward, and new technologies upend the logic we’ve relied on to deter the weapons’ use.

About the Guests
Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall
Distinguished Professor, Georgia Tech Nunn School of International Affairs
Headshot of Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall
Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall is the former deputy Secretary of Energy and is currently a distinguished professor at Georgia Tech's Nunn School of International Affairs.
Headshot of Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall
Scott Sagan
Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science, Stanford University
Headshot of Scott Sagan
Scott Sagan is the Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science at Stanford University.
Headshot of Scott Sagan
Vice President, Studies
Council expert Brian Hanson
Brian Hanson is the Vice President of Studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He oversees the Council's research operations and hosts the Council's weekly podcast, Deep Dish on Global Affairs.
Council expert Brian Hanson
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Crown Center Content This content is produced by the Lester Crown Center, which aims to shape debates and inform decisions on important US foreign policy and national security issues.