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Defense and Security

Cooperation or Coercion? The Views of US Opinion Leaders on Foreign Policy Approaches

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

The 2020 Chicago Council on Global Affairs-University of Texas at Austin survey explores to what extent Democratic, Republican, and Independent foreign policy professionals support Biden’s international agenda.

Image of the White House
David Strickler
Global Economy, Trade and Business

Greatest Threat: Democrats Say White Nationalism, Republicans Say China

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

New survey data shows a partisan divide on what Americans believe is the greatest threat to the United States: Democrats rank violent white nationalist groups the highest, while Republicans list China as the greatest threat.

Left: Multiple white nationalist groups march to McIntire Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Right: People wave with the Chinese flag before the a meeting of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, June 1, 2017.
REUTERS
Public Opinion

SolarWinds Hack: Americans Prefer Sanctions over Retaliatory Cyberattack against Russia

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

Dina Smeltz and Brendan Helm analyze new public opinion data showing there is partisan agreement on how best to respond to the recent Russian hack.

Computer hardware
Michael Dziedzic
Public Opinion

Preventing Nuclear Proliferation and Reassuring America's Allies

RESEARCH
Report by Multiple Authors

A task force, cochaired by Chuck Hagel, Malcolm Rifkind, and Kevin Rudd with Ivo Daalder, argues that fraying American alliances and a rapidly changing security environment have shaken America’s nuclear security guarantees and threaten the 50-year-old nuclear nonproliferation regime.

Then US Vice President Joe Biden visits Observation Post Ouellette inside the DMZ, the military border separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom in 2013.
REUTERS
Defense and Security

Americans Positive on South Korea Despite Trump’s Views on Alliance

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

American's favorable views of South Korea are at an all-time high and a majority of Americans support using US troops to defend South Korea if invaded by North Korea.

South Korean flag.
William Warby
Public Opinion

Do Republicans and Democrats Want a Cold War with China?

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

Dina Smeltz and Craig Kafura analyze survey data showing that for the first time in nearly two decades, a majority of Americans describe the development of China as a world power as a critical threat to the United States.

Chinese flag, Beijing, China.
Public Opinion

US Experts Consider China a Shifting and India a Stable Friend to Russia

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

Arik Burakovsky, Dina Smeltz, and Brendan Helm analyze a survey of American experts on Russia about opinions on the country's relations with China and India.

Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping shaking hands on July 26, 2018.
The Kremlin
Defense and Security

2019 Public Attitudes on US Intelligence

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

A 2019 survey confirmed broad support of US intelligence agencies, despite limited transparency and persistent criticism from President Donald Trump.

The entrance to the CIA New Headquarters Building (NHB) of the George Bush Center for Intelligence.
Central Intelligence Agency
Defense and Security

Majority of Iranians Oppose Development of Nuclear Weapons

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Multiple Authors

Nationwide surveys conducted by IranPoll show that although Iranians say their country should not develop nuclear weapons, they have lost confidence in the nuclear agreement.

Flag of Iran
David Sandoz
Defense and Security

With Tensions Receding, Americans Lose Fear of North Korea

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

The American public is now less concerned about the threat posed by North Korea.

North Korean soldiers look to the South through binoculars while on patrol.
Reuters
Public Opinion