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Results for:
Public Opinion Survey

Ahead of Biden-Suga Summit, Americans See Japan as the United States' Most Important Partner

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Craig Kafura and Karl Friedhoff discuss US foreign relations with Japan.

President Joe Biden meets with the leaders of Japan, India, and Australia
The White House
Public Opinion

Disappointed in Rouhani, Iranians Seek a Different Sort of Leader in June Elections

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

New indirect talks between the United States and Iran on a return to the Iran deal could help the outlook for a moderate candidate in the next election.

a man in Iran on elections
REUTERS
Public Opinion

South Koreans See China as More Threat than Partner, But Not the Most Critical Threat Facing the Country

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

Majorities of South Koreans cite low birthrates in South Korea and North Korea’s nuclear program as larger threats than China's economic or military power.

2021 meeting between Moon, Blinken, and Austin
REUTERS
Public Opinion

American Public Divided on Cooperating with, Confronting China

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

A March 2021 survey finds Americans see US priorities in Asia to be less about limiting the expansion of China and more about economic growth and strengthening democracy.

A guard outside the People Hall in Beijing.
REUTERS
Public Opinion

Iranians and Americans Support A Mutual Return to JCPOA

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

A joint Council and IranPoll survey shows that although Iranian and American public support for the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action has waned over time, there is still sizable backing for it in both countries.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif meets with International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Director General Rafael Grossi in Tehran, Iran February 21, 2021.
REUTERS
Public Opinion

Despite Political Tension, Americans and Russians See Cooperation as Essential

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

A joint Chicago Council on Global Affairs and the Levada Analytical Center survey shows few Russians or Americans expect great changes to US-Russia ties now or in the next 10 years, although both publics see the merits of collaboration.

Biden and Putin shake hands
REUTERS
Public Opinion

Russians See Greater Reward than Risk in Closer Relations with China

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

As Russia and China grow closer through economic ties, a joint Chicago Council on Global Affairs-Levada Analytical Center survey finds that the Russian public sees little downside to the growing bilateral relationship.

Russia flag
IGORN from Pixabay
Public Opinion

Cooperation or Coercion? The Views of US Opinion Leaders on Foreign Policy Approaches

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

The 2020 Chicago Council on Global Affairs-University of Texas at Austin survey explores to what extent Democratic, Republican, and Independent foreign policy professionals support Biden’s international agenda.

Image of the White House
David Strickler
Global Economy, Trade and Business

In Russia, Navalny Inspires Respect for Some, Indifference for Most

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Surveys from the Chicago Council and the Levada Analytical Center show that Russians are generally indifferent to Navalny's actions, and more suspect that he staged his own poisoning or it was a "provocation from the West" than believe the Russian government targeted him.

a painting of Alexei Navalny on a wall
REUTERS
Public Opinion

Greatest Threat: Democrats Say White Nationalism, Republicans Say China

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

New survey data shows a partisan divide on what Americans believe is the greatest threat to the United States: Democrats rank violent white nationalist groups the highest, while Republicans list China as the greatest threat.

Left: Multiple white nationalist groups march to McIntire Park in Charlottesville, Va., on Aug. 12, 2017. Right: People wave with the Chinese flag before the a meeting of Chinese Premier Li Keqiang and German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the Chancellery in Berlin, Germany, June 1, 2017.
REUTERS
Public Opinion