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US Foreign Policy

Ahead of Biden-Suga Summit, Americans See Japan as the United States' Most Important Partner

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Craig Kafura and Karl Friedhoff analyze findings of a recent poll examining American public opinion on US relations with Japan.

President Joe Biden meets with the leaders of Japan, India, and Australia
The White House
Public Opinion

American Public Divided on Cooperating with, Confronting China

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

A March 2021 survey finds Americans see US priorities in Asia to be less about limiting the expansion of China and more about economic growth and strengthening democracy.

A guard outside the People Hall in Beijing.
REUTERS
Public Opinion

Preventing Nuclear Proliferation and Reassuring America's Allies

RESEARCH
Report by Coauthors

A task force, cochaired by Chuck Hagel, Malcolm Rifkind, and Kevin Rudd with Ivo Daalder, argues that fraying American alliances and a rapidly changing security environment have shaken America’s nuclear security guarantees and threaten the 50-year-old nuclear nonproliferation regime.

Then US Vice President Joe Biden visits Observation Post Ouellette inside the DMZ, the military border separating the two Koreas, in Panmunjom in 2013.
REUTERS
Defense and Security

Divisions on US-China Policy: Opinion Leaders and the Public

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Craig Kafura, Dina Smeltz, Joshua Busby, Joshua D. Kertzer, Jonathan Monten, and Jordan Tama analyze recent surveys of foreign policy professionals and the American public on the degree of threat posed by China and how the United States should respond.

A US dollar banknote featuring American founding father Benjamin Franklin and a China's yuan banknote featuring late Chinese chairman Mao Zedong are seen among US and Chinese flags.
REUTERS/Jason Lee
Public Opinion

Democrats, Republicans Support Alliances, Disagree on International Organizations

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

While Americans of all political stripes remain committed to allies and alliances, the public is divided along partisan lines on the value of international organizations.

US, NATO and Britain flags fly at the Alliance headquarters in Brussels.
Reuters
US Foreign Policy

Republicans, Democrats Split on Increasing US Defense Budget

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Craig Kafura

Overall, Americans prefer to maintain defense spending. But Democrats, younger people, and those with a college education prefer cuts, while Republicans prefer expansion.

soldiers from the US army complete drills
US Army
Public Opinion

Green COVID-19 Recovery and Transatlantic Leadership: What Are the Prospects?

RESEARCH
Report by Paul Hofhuis

A Democratic victory provides greater opportunity for transatlantic collaboration, but underlying structures for cooperation among societal stakeholders in the United States need to be reinvigorated.

U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry Remarks on COP21 and Action Beyond Paris
COP21
COVID-19

Americans Positive on South Korea Despite Trump’s Views on Alliance

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Karl Friedhoff

American's favorable views of South Korea are at an all-time high and a majority of Americans support using US troops to defend South Korea if invaded by North Korea.

South Korean flag.
William Warby
Public Opinion

Do Republicans and Democrats Want a Cold War with China?

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Dina Smeltz and Craig Kafura analyze survey data showing that for the first time in nearly two decades, a majority of Americans describe the development of China as a world power as a critical threat to the United States.

Chinese flag, Beijing, China.
Public Opinion

US Experts Anticipate Future Decline for Russia Among the Great Powers

RESEARCH
Public Opinion Survey by Coauthors

Arik Burakovsky, Dina Smeltz, and Brendan Helm find that while experts anticipate changes in the global balance of power in the next 20 years, with China overtaking the United States, they do not expect Russia to come out stronger.

Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump meet at the 2017 G-20 Hamburg Summit
Kremlin
Public Opinion