Skip to main content

The Case for America to Promote Democracy Abroad

The presidents of the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute join  Deep Dish  to explain why the United States must promote democracy abroad.
An Afghan woman casts her vote during parliamentary elections at a polling station in Kabul, Afghanistan
Play Podcast
Reuters

The breakdown of fledgling democracies in Iraq, Libya, and Afghanistan, the return of authoritarian leaders, and the resurgence of protesters in the streets all suggest that democracy promotion is a failed project. But the United States still has an essential role to play in promoting democratic institutions abroad, argue Ambassador Derek Mitchell and Daniel Twining. The presidents of the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute join Deep Dish to explain why.

Related Past Event Video

A sign reading Je Suis Charlie, after the shooting at the French newspaper Charlie Hebdo.
Francois Bazoge
PAST EVENT VIDEO
The Council welcomed Derek Mitchell and Daniel Twining—the presidents of the National Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute—to share their reflections on the state of democracy.
About the Guests
Derek Mitchell
President, National Democratic Institute
Daniel Twining
President, International Republican Institute
Vice President, Studies
Council expert Brian Hanson
Brian Hanson is the Vice President of Studies at the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. He oversees the Council's research operations and hosts the Council's weekly podcast, Deep Dish on Global Affairs.
Council expert Brian Hanson