June 30, 2016

Top Five Most-Watched Videos of 2016 (So Far)

As our program season winds down for the summer, we take a look back at the top five most-watched videos of 2016, so far. Rewatch or discover the speakers, topics, and ideas that brought together our largest digital audiences.  

1. George Friedman on the Global Crises

February 25, 2016

Once again, Geopolitical Futures and Stratfor founder George Friedman tops our list of most-watched videos, this time giving his incisive analysis on global hotspots in Europe, Russia, the Middle East, China, and more. 

 

 


2. Chicago Forum on Global Cities

June 1-3, 2016

Browse this video playlist from the 2016 Chicago Forum on Global Cities, which brought together nearly 600 delegates and 60 speakers from more than 30 countries to talk about the power and limitations of global cities, global threats, cultural heritage, combating urban violence, climate change, and more. 

 

 


3. Yanis Varoufakis: Europe and the Austerity Fallacy

April 29, 2016

The European Union is a house of cards that threatens regional stability and global prosperity, argues Yanis Varoufakis. The former Greek finance minister gives a captivating talk about the key lessons from the Eurozone crisis – some that are even more salient today in light of the recent Brexit vote. 

 

 


4. David Axelrod on the 2016 Elections

February 16,  2016

Mixing campaign trail insights with Chicago anecdotes and a dash of sardonic humor, political strategist David Axelrod delivers a can't-miss talk with Natasha Korecki, a senior reporter for POLITICO, on the candidates and issues surrounding the 2016 presidential election.

 

 


5. The Future of Money

February 4, 2016

Economists Tyler Cowen and Randall Kroszner engage in an amiable, yet astute, dialogue about the economic, political, and social implications of disruptive financial technologies. 

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive

| By Ivo H. Daalder

This Week's Reads: The US-China Collision at APEC

The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit became a flashpoint in what's now the most significant great power clash since the end of the Cold War. “China and the United States hijacked the APEC spirit,” one diplomat said.


This Week's Reads - A Return to the Interwar Era

French President Emmanuel Macron's speech Sunday sounded more like desperation than hope, afraid that we may have already turned the corner into a world full of nationalism, populism, and competition.






Wait Just a Minute: Michael Beschloss

In this episode, historian and author Michael Beschloss answers questions on presidential history, the system of checks and balances, and offers advice for President Trump and Congress.



| By Iain Whitaker

Stoking Brexit From the Council

With Brexit drawing near, this an important moment to note that the Chicago Council on Global Affairs has not been a passive observer of the awkward association between Britain and Europe. On three separate occasions, at critical moments in the UK's relationship with Europe, the Council provided a platform for leading Conservative Party politicians to make waves from across the ocean. From the Council's archive emerges a curious tale of treachery, tantrums, angry editors, and airport pizza.


| By John Austin

Germany Accelerates Change in Its “Rust Belt”

Both the United States and Germany are seeing evolving economies in their respective “rust belts,” formerly robust engines of the industrial era. Both are developing strategies to address these challenges but, unlike President Trump's approach, Germany is focused on accelerating change so the region will thrive in the future.





Wait Just a Minute: Francis Fukuyama

With midterm elections fast-approaching, professor and author Francis Fukuyama answers questions on the rise in identity politics, its effects on democracy, and how countries can build inclusive identities.