The Transatlantic Alliance in a Multipolar World

November 17, 2010

By: Thomas Wright, Executive Director of Studies, The Chicago Council on Global Affairs; Richard Weitz, Senior Fellow and Director, Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute

In spring 2010, The Chicago Council on Global Affairs launched a project to examine the transatlantic alliance in the strategic landscape of the 21st century and to develop a series of recommendations to ensure the continued relevance of the US-European relationship. The project addresses questions about NATO’s role as the geopolitical centre of gravity shifts toward Asia, and how an alliance shaped by the Cold War can best adapt to the challenge of engaging the Muslim world as well as the emerging geopolitical strengths of China and India. The final report, The Transatlantic Alliance in a Multipolar World, was released on November 17, 2010.

In the spring and early summer of 2010, The Chicago Council organized roundtable discussions in conjunction with partners in Washington, DC and London to engage additional experts to help inform the project. Thomas Wright, executive director for studies at The Chicago Council, and Richard Weitz, senior fellow and director of the Center for Political-Military Analysis at Hudson Institute, coauthored the project’s final report, The Transatlantic Alliance in a Multipolar World. This report argues that the transatlantic alliance has the potential to become more relevant to the United States as the geopolitical center of gravity moves toward Asia, and makes a series of recommendations for deepening cooperation.

The Chicago Council also enlisted four experts to draft a series of papers, each touching on a particular aspect of the alliance:  


The papers were presented at release events in Brussels on October 25 and in Berlin on October 27, 2010, followed by a release in Washington, DC.

This project was generously funded by the Robert Bosch Foundation, the McCormick Foundation, and the Adenauer Fund at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

The Transatlantic Alliance in a Multipolar World

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