American Attitudes toward Korea: Growing Support for a Solid Relationship

October 28, 2014

By: Scott Snyder, Senior Fellow for Korea Studies and Director of the Program on US-Korea Policy, Council on Foreign Relations

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs 2014 survey of American public opinion on foreign policy shows steadily growing American support for the US-Korea (ROK) alliance. This support is growing despite a tendency toward greater selectivity among Americans regarding how, when, and where the United States should actively assert itself in world affairs, especially through use of military force. Consistent with the public’s cool feelings toward North Korea and a continued US-North Korean stalemate over its nuclear program, American willingness to support the US troop presence in Seoul to defend against North Korean aggression has steadily grown to its highest point yet recorded in Chicago Council Surveys. However, some notable gaps between American and South Korean perceptions of neighboring countries remain, which may shed light on the future limits of US-ROK alliance cooperation beyond deterrence against North Korea.
American Attitudes toward Korea: Growing Support for a Solid Relationship

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