October 30, 2013 | By

Guest Commentary: Importance of Strict Currency Manipulation Rules in TPP

By Former Governor of Missouri Matt Blunt, President of the American Automotive Policy Council

The fate of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) may be decided over the next few months, possibly even before the end of the year. TPP has the potential to be the most important trade pact since NAFTA and could create thousands of jobs in the United States, boosting exports and the overall economy. Regrettably, these benefits are in jeopardy unless the agreement includes strong and enforceable currency disciplines.

From an automotive perspective, currency manipulation both subsidizes our competitors' exports to the US and around the world, and puts US exports at an equal cost disadvantage. The Peterson Institute estimates that foreign currency manipulation has resulted in a loss of 1-5 million jobs in the United States, and an increase of between $200-500 million in the US trade deficit.

Japan has a long history of intervening in its currency markets to sustain its export-driven economy. Japan's inclusion in the TPP makes it vital that the TPP include a strong and enforceable currency discipline.

There is growing support for addressing this 21st century trade barrier. A broad, bipartisan majority of the US Congress has called for strict currency manipulation rules in the TPP. One letter signed by 230 US House members and another signed by 60 US Senators called for a high standard agreement that includes strong and enforceable currency disciplines. As a broad swath of America's elected officials have acknowledged, trade is key to our future economic growth, but it needs to be done right.

Everyone agrees, the Trans-Pacific Partnership could be an economic boon throughout the Pacific Rim. However, the negotiating members must ensure that currency manipulation rules are in place and enforced. Otherwise, years of work and negotiations will not deliver on the economic growth that will benefit us all.

About

Phil Levy is senior fellow on the global economy at The Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Previously he was associate professor of business administration at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business. He was formerly a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and taught at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs. From 2003 to 2006, he served first as senior economist for trade for President Bush’s Council of Economic Advisers and then as a member of Secretary of State Rice’s Policy Planning Staff, covering international economic matters. Before working in government, he was a faculty member of Yale University’s Department of Economics for nine years and spent one of those as academic director of Yale’s Center for the Study of Globalization.

His academic writings have appeared in such outlets as The American Economic ReviewEconomic Journal, and theJournal of International Economics. He is a regular contributor to Foreign Policy magazine’s online Shadow Government section and writes on topics including trade policy, economic relations with China, and the European economic crisis. Dr. Levy has testified before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Joint Economic Committee, the House Committee on Ways and Mean, and the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission. He received his PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 1994 and his AB in Economics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor in 1988.

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