October 16, 2014 | By Dina Smeltz

The Wild Popularity of Trade Deals and Republicans as Potential New Doves

Two recent articles that we wanted to draw to your attention based on the new Chicago Council Survey results. The first, by Phil Levy, Chicago Council senior fellow on the global economy, discusses the rough patches hitting negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), despite broad public support for trade agreements. The article sheds light on why such popular trade agreements have yet to pass; read it on the Foreign Policy Shadow Government Blog.

The second article is co-written by yours truly, Dina Smeltz, Chicago Council senior fellow, public opinion and foreign policy, and Craig Kafura, Chicago Council senior program officer. While Republicans have been known for their hawkish stance on US military intervention abroad, the 2014 Chicago Council on Global Affairs indicates that there may be some shifts. Read more at Washington Post’s Monkey Cage.

Let us know what you think!

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs highlights critical shifts in American public thinking on US foreign policy through public opinion surveys and research conducted under the Lester Crown Center on US Foreign Policy. 

The annual Chicago Council Survey, first conducted in 1974, is a valuable resource for policymakers, academics, media, and the general public. The Council also surveys American leaders in government, business, academia, think tanks, and religious organizations biennially to compare trends in their thinking with overall trends. And collaborating with partner organizations, the survey team periodically conducts parallel surveys of public opinion in other regions of the world to compare with US public opinion. 

The Running Numbers blog features regular commentary and analysis from the Council’s public opinion and US foreign policy research team, including a series of flash polls of a select group of foreign policy experts to assess their opinions on critical foreign policy topics driving the news.

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