May 13, 2019 | By Karl Friedhoff, Leena Kim

Moon's Approval Down, North Korea Not a Primary Driver

When South Korea’s president, Moon Jae-in, took office in June 2017 he did so with record-breaking approval rates above 80 percent. But as his presidency has continued there has been a steady decline, falling to 45 percent in a late April survey by Gallup Korea. This decline has sparked hand-wringing among many Korea watchers. A common refrain is that his support has collapsed, and his presidency may be near crisis. A second refrain is that his North Korea policy has proven unpopular and he is now taking the hit for his engagement policy. Just one problem: none of those things are supported by the data.

First, in the most recent polling data available, President Moon’s approval rates have indeed declined, but his approval rates do not differ significantly from previous presidents at the same points in their respective terms. While he started out higher than most previous presidents, he is now in the middle-of-the-pack in terms of historical approval rates.

Second, the reason for that decline does not appear to be tied to his North Korea policy.  In the survey, respondents were asked whether they approve or disapprove of President Moon’s handling of several issues facing the country. While the public is evenly divided on his North Korea policy, with 45 percent approval and 43 percent disapproval, they are much more disappointed with his handling of the economy, employment, and personnel affairs. Half or more disapprove of his management on each of these issues, especially on the economy.

Moreover, North Korea is not as high on the list of priorities for the South Korean public as is often imagined. Like publics around the world, there is far more interest on more clearly defined domestic issues. In a late 2018 poll, 59 percent said they wanted the president to focus on the economy (54%) or welfare (5%). Just 12 percent said the focus should be on peace on the Korean Peninsula (9%) or diplomacy with neighboring countries (3%).

President Moon’s approval rates are indeed sliding, but the reasons for this slide are knowable. It does not appear to be driven by his handling of North Korea. Instead, the South Korean public wants Moon to focus his efforts on the fragile economy. Recent North Korean missile launches are unlikely to change that desire.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs highlights critical shifts in American public thinking on US foreign policy through public opinion surveys and research conducted under the Lester Crown Center on US Foreign Policy. 

The annual Chicago Council Survey, first conducted in 1974, is a valuable resource for policymakers, academics, media, and the general public. The Council also surveys American leaders in government, business, academia, think tanks, and religious organizations biennially to compare trends in their thinking with overall trends. And collaborating with partner organizations, the survey team periodically conducts parallel surveys of public opinion in other regions of the world to compare with US public opinion. 

The Running Numbers blog features regular commentary and analysis from the Council’s public opinion and US foreign policy research team, including a series of flash polls of a select group of foreign policy experts to assess their opinions on critical foreign policy topics driving the news.

Archive


| By Jack Benjamin

2019 Wrap Up

The year in review on all things public opinion.



| By Anqi Pan

Post-Election, Hong Kongers Remain Mistrustful of Police

Amidst ongoing unrest, Hong Kong held local elections on November 24th. The vote, widely seen as a referendum on the handling of the protests by the current government, saw pro-democracy candidates secure 85 percent of the seats. As the results of the latest round of surveys by the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute show, greater challenges now lie ahead for Beijing in its handling of Hong Kong. 


| By Brendan Helm

Adieu, World Trade Organization

The World Trade Organization's dispute settlement mechanism has ceased to function. Without a formal means of disputing trade grievances, the future of the international trade system is murky.





| By Jack Benjamin

6 Ways in Which Liberal and Moderate Democrats Diverge on Key Issues

Democratic primary season is well under way, highlighted by recent debates and battleground fundraising by the large field of presidential hopefuls. As candidates deliver their pitch to voters, party supporters are not in lockstep on every issue.


| By Ruby Scanlon

The Generational Divide Over Climate Change

America’s young and old are split on what to do about climate change, presenting a major hurdle for the country’s youth to attain serious and immediate action.