February 21, 2018 | By Dina Smeltz

ICYMI: Recent Council Surveys on Russia-US Relations

New polls are in from Russia and the US and again their findings offer a mixed bag: a grim outlook on the future of US-Russian relations and glimmers of hope for engagement on mutual interests. 

Last year, Russians and Americans alike thought that Donald Trump would improve US-Russian relations. Russians have since realized this will not be the case (51% think US-Russian relations haven’t changed under Trump). Instead, mistrust abounds as both sides think the other is trying to influence their domestic affairs (78% of Russians think the US tries to influence its domestic affairs, 69% of Americans think Russia tries to influence its domestic affairs). And while the majority of Russians think their country needs to improve relations with the US and other Western countries (75%), they remain largely unwilling to see their government make concessions in exchange for lifting US sanctions. This does not bode well for the relationship as Americans are committed to maintaining (39%) or increasing these sanctions (38%).
 

Where do Russians and Americans agree? Neither see a settlement to the Syrian Civil War with Assad remaining president as ideal; more Russians oppose (49 percent) than support (27 percent) using Russian troops to prevent his overthrow. And while more than two-thirds of Americans would support a settlement to the Syrian crisis that establishes a new leader (70%), only a quarter would support a settlement that allows Assad to remain in power (25%). Per usual, matters of international security is where Americans and Russians most agree. Both publics believe that international terrorism (75% Americans, 70% Russians), nuclear proliferation (62% Americans, 52% Russians), and Islamic fundamentalism (59% Americans, 52% Russians) pose a critical threat to their countries’ interests over the next ten years.

Read more in the Council’s three issue briefs on the US-Russian relationship, American and Russian views on sanctions, and American and Russian views on the crisis in Syria and North Korea’s nuclear program. And stay tuned: these briefs are the first in a two-year project, generously funded by the Carnegie Corporation, to study the US-Russian relationship through the lens of public and elite opinion.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs highlights critical shifts in American public thinking on US foreign policy through public opinion surveys and research conducted under the Lester Crown Center on US Foreign Policy. 

The annual Chicago Council Survey, first conducted in 1974, is a valuable resource for policymakers, academics, media, and the general public. The Council also surveys American leaders in government, business, academia, think tanks, and religious organizations biennially to compare trends in their thinking with overall trends. And collaborating with partner organizations, the survey team periodically conducts parallel surveys of public opinion in other regions of the world to compare with US public opinion. 

The Running Numbers blog features regular commentary and analysis from the Council’s public opinion and US foreign policy research team, including a series of flash polls of a select group of foreign policy experts to assess their opinions on critical foreign policy topics driving the news.

Archive




| By Craig Kafura

Americans Support Ending Cuba Trade Embargo

As the United States and Cuba continue to work towards a normalization of the relationship, results from the new 2015 Chicago Council Survey show that Americans favor lifting the trade embargo on Cuba and believe the proposed changes in US-Cuba relations will benefit both countries.






| By Craig Kafura

The Republican Divide on Immigration

There are over a dozen Republican candidates in the running for their party's nomination, whether or not they've formally announced. On most topics, they present a unified front—but immigration has proven to be a far more divisive topic.