June 16, 2017 | By Craig Kafura

Farewell, Helmut Kohl

By Craig Kafura and Karen Whisler

Former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl has passed away at the age of 87. The Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ long-running public opinion survey asked how Americans felt about Kohl during his term in 1982, 1986, and again in 1990. In a 0-100 ‘thermometer’ scale Americans were fairly neutral with regard to Kohl, ranking him with a median score in the 50’s. This put him in line with leaders such as Nelson Mandela and French President Francois Mitterrand, above European Commission president Jacques Delors and former US President Richard Nixon, and below figures like UK PM Margaret Thatcher, Soviet Premier Mikhail Gorbachev, and then-President George H. W. Bush. 

Yet Kohl’s West Germany—and after 1990, Germany—were consistently warmly regarded by Americans, both during and following his tenure as Chancellor. 

Though Kohl left politics in 2002, his political legacy lives on. Kohl's 1994 cabinet included as minister for the environment and nuclear safety one Dr. Angela Merkel, who now has had a run of political success nearly as long as Kohl’s, serving as Chancellor since 2005. If she wins reelection to her fourth term this fall, she would have the potential to surpass Kohl as the longest-tenured Chancellor in modern German history. 

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs highlights critical shifts in American public thinking on US foreign policy through public opinion surveys and research conducted under the Lester Crown Center on US Foreign Policy. 

The annual Chicago Council Survey, first conducted in 1974, is a valuable resource for policymakers, academics, media, and the general public. The Council also surveys American leaders in government, business, academia, think tanks, and religious organizations biennially to compare trends in their thinking with overall trends. And collaborating with partner organizations, the survey team periodically conducts parallel surveys of public opinion in other regions of the world to compare with US public opinion. 

The Running Numbers blog features regular commentary and analysis from the Council’s public opinion and US foreign policy research team, including a series of flash polls of a select group of foreign policy experts to assess their opinions on critical foreign policy topics driving the news.

Archive


| By Dina Smeltz

Russia Reality Check

US-Russia relations appear to be at an all-time low ever since the establishment of the Russian Federation in the fall of 1991.



| By Dina Smeltz

Ann Coulter, the World Cup and What the Polls Show

Conservative columnist Ann Coulter probably didn't watch the US play Belgium on Tuesday afternoon. But that didn't stop her from tweeting: “Doing the job Americans just won’t do: Immigrants fill up roster of ‘U.S.’ soccer team.”





| By Dina Smeltz

Less is More: American Views on Ukraine

In today's post, we would like to highlight two surveys that were conducted in late March that have not been amplified as much as Pew, Gallup, and other polls about American attitudes on the situation in Ukraine.







| By Dina Smeltz

In Advance of the Three Amigos Summit

Coinciding with NAFTA’s 20th anniversary year, President Obama along with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper are slated to discuss trade, investment and security issues next week at the North American Summit in Toluca, Mexico.


| By Dina Smeltz

Business Leaders on Immigration Reform: The View from the Midwest

In his State of the Union Speech on January 28th, President Obama urged Congress to "heed the call of business leaders, labor leaders, faith leaders and law enforcement" to implement immigration reforms, making the case that immigration will grow the economy and shrink US deficits by almost $1 trillion in the next two decades.