May 18, 2012 | By Roger Thurow

A Transformational Day

The Chicago Council Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security opened with a jolt of urgency and possibility.

“The transformational day begins,” proclaimed Dan Glickman, co-chair of the Council’s Global Agricultural Development Initiative and former secretary of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The Symposium, bringing together leaders from governments around the world and multinational corporations, is setting the tone for this weekend’s G8 summit at Camp David.  Glickman said the G8’s deliberations on will be “critical in determining food and nutrition security of future generations.”

Michael Froman, assistant to President Obama and deputy national security advisor for international economic affairs, said a focus on nutrition security will be a central G8 theme.

Tom Arnold, chief executive of Concern Worldwide, hailed this focus on nutrition – on improving food quality in addition to increasing food production – as “unprecedented.”

At Camp David, the leaders of the top industrial nations will be joined by African presidents and private sector CEOs in advancing the G8 commitment to increased agricultural development investments made three years ago in L’Aquila, Italy.

Froman said President Obama’s Feed the Future initiative was beginning to produce results on the ground in some 20 countries.  He noted that agricultural productivity in those countries was eight times higher than the global average.

He also said the administration was “fully committed to an assistance agenda” in a time when Congressional budget cutters have been targeting foreign.  But, he added, “Government assistance alone is not sufficient.  It takes commitment on the ground” from all those involved on the agricultural development front.

As the Camp David summit opens, he said, “it will take all of us represented here to achieve our goals.  As you look to the G8, we look to you.”

Archive

| By Roger Thurow

Historic Moment

Bread for the World’s new Hunger Report raises the stakes right from its very first sentence:

“2011 is a time of opportunity to achieve lasting progress against global hunger and malnutrition.”

| By Roger Thurow

Watching the Numbers

There’s plenty of numbers-watching going on in Washington D.C. and other world capitals these days.  Mainly, the numbers with currency symbols in front of them, the numbers in government budgets.  



| By Roger Thurow

A Dangerous Myopia

It is lamentable that the deep and persistent economic woes in the U.S. and Europe are breeding a certain dangerous myopia in international development affairs.

| By Roger Thurow

Faltering Momentum

Speaking on a panel earlier this year, I was outlining the gathering momentum in the fight against hunger: The push of the Obama administration to create Feed the Future, the commitments of the G8 and G20 leaders to increase support for agriculture development, the greater involvement of philanthropists, corporations, universities and humanitarian agencies.

| By Roger Thurow

Creating the Give-A-Damn

To honor this year’s winners of the World Food Prize, this column will go easy on the outrage and heavy on the inspire.

| By Roger Thurow

Show Them the Money

We – “we” being the rich world — asked the poorest countries to draw up comprehensive agriculture investment plans and tell us which were the highest priority projects to boost food production.  Do that, we informed them, and we will help finance the projects from a new multi-donor trust fund called the Global Agriculture Food Security Program, or GAFSP.

| By Roger Thurow

African Voices

Listen to these African voices:

“As our governments take action, we need the international community to do its part as well. A green revolution in Africa depends on locally driven solutions plus reliable donor support.  Neither ingredient is sufficient on its own – both are indispensable.”

| By Roger Thurow

For a Better Tomorrow

In Rwanda earlier this summer, I visited a rural project with the lyrical name, IBYIRINGIRO.  It means “hope” in Kinyarwanda, and trumpets this slogan: “that in which we have faith for a better tomorrow.”


| By Roger Thurow

Where There's a Will…

In Africa, the Way to an agriculture revolution has long been clear.  The original Green Revolution in Asia, in the 1960s and ‘70s, provides the classic roadmap.


| By Roger Thurow

Safe Farming

In the Bungoma Chemist shop, where you can get almost everything you need to battle a cold, de-worm your cattle or fertilizer your crops, something revolutionary is now on sale.


Multimedia

Videos


 


Digital Preview of The First 1,000 Days

In his new book, The First 1,000 Days, Council senior fellow Roger Thurow illuminates the 1,000 Days initiative to end early childhood malnutrition through the compelling stories of new mothers in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago. Get a first-look at photos and stories from the book in this new web interactive.

» Learn more.
» Order your copy of the book.

Books

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow’s book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Learn more »

The Last Hunger Season

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers' lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world's growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO's, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Learn more »

EnoughEnough

Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

Learn more »