February 19, 2016

Recommended Reading

The First 1,000 Days highlights the multi-dimensional nature of child nutrition—everything from food access, water and sanitation, government policy, violence, to poverty can impact a child’s ability to reach his or her potential. Check out these recent developments that are influencing early child growth and development, and remember to preorder your copy of The First 1,000 Days.
 
Support for Breast-Feeding, in a Multitude of Ways, Jane E. Brody, The New York Times
With access to timely information, professional and workplace support, and hands-on help when needed, many more women would breastfeed their babies, and do so exclusively for the first half year of life as recommended by the WHO. Today, more than three-fourths of women start to breast-feed, although more than half end up weaning their babies sooner than they would have liked, often short of six months. During pregnancy, women trying to decide whether to breast-feed deserve to be informed about its benefits and barriers and be given an opportunity and assistance to find ways around any obstacles.
 
How to Reduce India’s Infant Mortality Rate, Suryatapa BhattacharyaThe Wall Street Journal
Child mortality rates in India could be significantly reduced if community health workers visited new mothers regularly, a new study suggests. The study, published in the Lancet, aimed to find ways to reduce India’s child mortality rate, which lags behind most of its neighbors including Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and Nepal. Researchers followed health workers who visited rural homes after a child was born and encouraged women to access post-natal programs to learn about nutrition, vaccination schedules, and breastfeeding. Some of the simple, yet effective, lessons came from teaching new mothers how to wrap newborns to prevent exposure to cold, skin-to-skin care, birth preparedness, and making sure they reached a hospital in time for medical care.
 
How Text Messages and Volunteer Midwives Are Saving Lives in Rwanda, Sophie GoodchildThe Guardian
Rwanda’s 45,000 community health workers, including 15,000 dedicated to improving maternity support, are helping to transform healthcare in rural areas. Elected by village committees, these volunteers have contributed significantly to Rwanda’s progress in reducing the deaths of mothers and young children. Behind this success is RapidSMS, a simple mobile phone and data collection system used by health workers to monitor pregnant women and newborns. Piloted by the health ministry in 2009, the service enables healthcare workers to track child nutrition as well as analyze maternal deaths.
 
Measuring the Cost of Hunger in Africa's Emerging Economies, The Guardian
Africa is home to the world’s fourth largest economy, holds one-third of the world’s mineral reserves and one-tenth of its oil. Economic growth in the last decade has averaged more than 5 percent per year, yet nearly a third of the estimated 868 million people affected by hunger and food insecurity live on the continent. There are more children that are stunted—they are short for their age, an indicator of chronic malnutrition—in Africa than there were 20 years ago, a situation that poses a major risk to future economic development. 

Archive


| By Roger Thurow

My Moment of Great Disruption

In a 2013 TEDxChange talk, Roger Thurow talks about the smallholder farmers of Africa and the potential for good news in agricultural development.


| By Roger Thurow

Hay Festival 2013: a look at the effects of famine

In the first year classroom of Shemena Godo Primary School, in Boricha, Ethiopia, three dozen children study the alphabet. On a black chalkboard, teacher Chome Muse highlights the letter B and writes the combination with each vowel. Ba, be, bi, bo, bu.

| By Roger Thurow

A Mother's Day parable from Uganda

A mother knows. “This child is brilliant,” Harriet Okaka says about her one-year-old son, Abraham.  She isn’t bragging, just observing.  “I can tell, just by looking at him,” she says, “the way he plays, the way he is.”

| By Roger Thurow

1,000 Days Project

Roger Thurow’s next book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

| By Roger Thurow

Imagine this: food aid reform

As word spread earlier this week of the food aid reform section of President Obama’s 2014 budget, I wondered how Jerman Amente would greet the news.


| By Roger Thurow

Give peas a chance

As the ballots were being counted in the recent Kenya election, I saw photos of people displaying the encouraging message: Give Peace a Chance.  So far, that sentiment seems to be holding.


| By Roger Thurow

Forward ever

The young man from the farm was looking smart in an olive green suit, salmon tie and cufflinks.  His black shoes were a bit scuffed, but his English was polished.  “We are moving forward,” he said.  “Forward ever, backward never.”

| By Roger Thurow

Learning to Fish

In the vast assembly room at the Greater Chicago Food Depository, overlooking one of the nation’s premier food banking facilities, Drexton Granberry joyfully came to the end of his speech.  


| By Roger Thurow

A Thanksgiving Tale: The Hungercloth

I often write and speak about the awful oxymoron, "Hungry Farmers." How can the smallholder farmers of Africa suffer through an annual hunger season when every morning they rise with one task: grow food for their families?


Multimedia

Videos


 


Digital Preview of The First 1,000 Days

In his new book, The First 1,000 Days, Council senior fellow Roger Thurow illuminates the 1,000 Days initiative to end early childhood malnutrition through the compelling stories of new mothers in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago. Get a first-look at photos and stories from the book in this new web interactive.

» Learn more.
» Order your copy of the book.

Books

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow’s book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Learn more »

The Last Hunger Season

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers' lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world's growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO's, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Learn more »

EnoughEnough

Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

Learn more »