December 20, 2017 | By Roger Thurow

Outrage and Inspire with Roger Thurow - A Craving for Nutrition Knowledge

A new mother learns about nutrition in the western highlands of Guatemala. Photo by the author. 

 

With this podcast series, we open a new front in our storytelling, adding the magic of audio narratives to our writing, photos, and videos. We’re calling this series: Outrage and Inspire, storytelling from the author of the real hunger games trilogy – Council senior fellow Roger Thurow.

The central outrage of these stories is that we have brought famine, hunger, malnutrition, and stunting – such Medieval sufferings – with us into the 21st century.  Yes, we have made progress over the past several decades, reducing by half the number of people dying of hunger.  We will certainly celebrate successes in our stories.  But still, three million children die every year of malnutrition and related diseases.  And what about those who survive, what becomes of them?  Well, one of every four children in our world today is stunted, either physically or mentally or both, from malnutrition in their earliest days and months and years.  And get this: about half of our planet’s entire population is malnourished in some manner – they are either chronically hungry (about 800 million people not getting enough calories for an active life every day); or micro-nutrient deficient (about two billion people lacking the proper vitamins and minerals in their diets for adequate growth of the brain or body); or severely overweight or obese (escalating toward two billion).

It is absurd, obscene – the darkest stain on our global conscience – that in our grand new Millennium, with so much incredible technology and communications capability literally at our fingertips, we tolerate such malnutrition in our world.

The outrages of hunger are many.  But so, too, are the inspirations of people who confront – and conquer – hunger and malnutrition.  The moms and dads and children, the farmers and fishers, the scientists and activists, the midwives and nutritionists and community health workers.  They provide both the outrage and the inspiration – and the stories of this podcast series.

In this episode, we hear from new moms and moms-to-be about the universal craving for nutrition knowledge.  From the western highlands in Guatemala, we learn how knowledge can be both power, and a burden. A narrative from The First 1,000 Days book.

 

Archive



| By Roger Thurow

A Glimpse of Feeding the Future

As leaders of the world’s top industrial countries gather for the Group of Eight summit in Canada, they can look to the long-suffering hills of Rwanda to see the fruits – and vegetables — of their actions.


| By Roger Thurow

It's the Security

For anyone who doesn’t “get” the moral and economic imperative of ending hunger through agriculture development, here’s another motivating imperative: security, both domestic and global.

| By Roger Thurow

Feet to the Fire

Just back from Sudan, Rajiv Shah, USAID administrator, came to the Chicago Council’s Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security this morning with fresh evidence that food security is the key to national prosperity, regional stability and international peace.  

| By Roger Thurow

She's the Boss

As Rajiv Shah spoke at last week’s Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security, I thought about an image in his old office at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation before he became Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.  Hanging on the wall behind his desk was a photo of a child crouching in a blue wash bucket somewhere in Africa.  Only her head was visible above the bucket’s rim.
Tell me about the girl, I asked.

| By Roger Thurow

Starting Early

The clamor begins just inside the door of Ridge Academy elementary school on Chicago’s south side.  Short essays and drawings shout out to all those who pass:

“Many people are dying now because of hunger.”


| By Roger Thurow

Fighting Hunger: Law of the Land

From across the pond, amid the sniping and bickering of the current election season in the United Kingdom, comes a worthy idea: enshrining in law the nation’s commitment to provide a certain level of foreign development aid.


| By Roger Thurow

All Together Now

It’s all the same really, the clamor over hunger, climate change and environmental preservation.  The common goal: improve food production and nutritional quality to feed the planet’s ever-expanding and more prosperous population while adapting to climate change and protecting delicate eco-systems.

| By Roger Thurow

Defusing Threats

It was in the scary days of the Cold War when Norman Borlaug, a plant breeder from small-town Iowa, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.  An odd choice, perhaps, given the nuclear standoff at the time, but the Norwegian committee bestowing the award had a good reason.

| By Roger Thurow

The Hungry Can't Eat Words

A blunt reminder of the task at hand came from Europe this week, aimed at the powers-that-be in the Group of Eight leading industrial countries, also known as the G8:

“Declarations, commitments and speeches don’t feed hungry people.”


Multimedia

Videos


 


Digital Preview of The First 1,000 Days

In his new book, The First 1,000 Days, Council senior fellow Roger Thurow illuminates the 1,000 Days initiative to end early childhood malnutrition through the compelling stories of new mothers in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago. Get a first-look at photos and stories from the book in this new web interactive.

» Learn more.
» Order your copy of the book.

Books

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow’s book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Learn more »

The Last Hunger Season

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers' lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world's growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO's, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Learn more »

EnoughEnough

Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

Learn more »