April 26, 2012 | By Roger Thurow

Keep It Up

Good work, now keep going.

That is the message to the U.S. government – both the administration and Congress – from the 2012 Progress Report on American Leadership in Global Agricultural Development released today by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

The report applauds the emergence of bipartisan support for food security and agricultural development, particularly during a time of nasty partisan sniping and budget slashing.  This has indeed put the U.S. at the front of international efforts to end hunger and poverty and strengthen the global food chain.  But, up front in the report, there is also this ominous exhortation:

“Without continued support, the strong efforts made thus far – many of which are already showing great promise – will have been tragically wasted.”

Allow me to add italics and bold emphasis to one of those words: tragically.  It is an important reminder of what is at stake at next month’s Camp David G8 meeting, where the leaders of the world’s largest industrial countries need to reinforce their expiring promises to conquer global hunger through agricultural development.  President Obama forged that international commitment three years ago when he also launched his own Feed the Future initiative.

Since then, as the report notes, strong progress has been made in the U.S. in setting up organizational structures, increasing staffing and putting those officials to work on innovative agricultural development programs and securing a reasonably steady flow of funding from Congress.  And with this flurry of activity in the past three years has come raised expectations among the intended beneficiaries: the smallholder farmers of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.  These farmers are at the center of Feed the Future, which has set out to reverse the decades-long neglect of agricultural development – and the hunger and poverty that has followed.  To slow down now, or to retreat, would not only be a severe stain on America’s image in these regions but it would be a serious blow to the prospects of meeting one of the great challenges of our age: the need to nearly double global food production by 2050 to keep up with a growing population that is also growing in prosperity.

The progress report, compiled by the Council’s Global Agricultural Development Initiative, gives an “outstanding” rating – the highest mark – to the State Department, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) for launching and advancing Feed the Future and other food security initiatives.  The report notes that the MCC’s disbursements for agricultural development to African countries have virtually doubled every year since 2009.  The Department of Agriculture and Congress received “good” evaluations, and the progress of the Peace Corps was “satisfactory.”  While the Peace Corps has increased the number of agriculture and environment volunteers, the report suggests it should encourage inventive agricultural development and food security programming worldwide.

U.S. agricultural development activities in three countries – Ethiopia, Ghana and Bangladesh – also received “outstanding” ratings.  The report focused on the work of U.S. government agencies operating in those countries; the impact in the farmers’ fields, though promising, was too new to be evaluated.  U.S. appropriations for agriculture increased significantly since 2009 in all three countries.

The report noted that both Congress and the administration missed an opportunity to institutionalize Feed the Future when they neglected to embrace the Global Food Security Act of 2009.  That piece of bipartisan legislation would have ensured the continuation of Feed the Future beyond the current administration and put in place legislation to authorize appropriations for the program annually.  Instead, Feed the Future and other food security programs have become budget battlegrounds.  The House of Representatives’ version of the fiscal year 2013 budget calls for the elimination of Feed the Future, claiming now is not the time to proceed with new spending programs.

But, the report argues, this is precisely the time to press ahead and build on the progress that has been made.

“The challenge will be to sustain this higher level of U.S. effort in agricultural development for the remainder of the ten-year period needed at minimum to produce a durable result.  The memory of the 2008 world food crisis my fade in the years ahead, and if nothing emerges to refocus policy energies in this area, the United States may once again lose sight of the smallholders and pastoralists in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia who are poor and hungry year in and year out regardless of the price of food on the world market….

“Avoiding a retreat into inactivity or a lapse into complacency will be the real challenge our leaders must confront in the years ahead.  The project has been launched, but it now must be carried forward with creative and watchful care.”

There is also this admonition: “A payoff from these efforts can only come about through a dedicated, longer-term effort in both Washington and the field.”

I have seen the possible payoffs during the past year while reporting my new book, The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change.  I have watched smallholder farmers in western Kenya – desperate farmers, struggling to feed their families throughout the year — double, triple, quadruple their maize yields when they have access to better seeds, a small amount of fertilizer, agriculture extension advice, improved storage practices, and the financing to pay for it all.

It is this improved food production and the diversification of their farming – the very goals of Feed the Future — that puts these families on the brink of change.  The farmers dearly want to move from subsistence farming to sustainable farming, which means that improving harvests and the nutritional quality of their food is not just as a one-year wonder but a regular event, year after year after year.

They know it will be a long journey to get to that point.  And they would like to know that the U.S. will be traveling along with them.

For these farmers to be abandoned now, again, would indeed be tragic.

Archive



| By Roger Thurow

A Glimpse of Feeding the Future

As leaders of the world’s top industrial countries gather for the Group of Eight summit in Canada, they can look to the long-suffering hills of Rwanda to see the fruits – and vegetables — of their actions.


| By Roger Thurow

It's the Security

For anyone who doesn’t “get” the moral and economic imperative of ending hunger through agriculture development, here’s another motivating imperative: security, both domestic and global.

| By Roger Thurow

Feet to the Fire

Just back from Sudan, Rajiv Shah, USAID administrator, came to the Chicago Council’s Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security this morning with fresh evidence that food security is the key to national prosperity, regional stability and international peace.  

| By Roger Thurow

She's the Boss

As Rajiv Shah spoke at last week’s Symposium on Global Agriculture and Food Security, I thought about an image in his old office at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation before he became Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.  Hanging on the wall behind his desk was a photo of a child crouching in a blue wash bucket somewhere in Africa.  Only her head was visible above the bucket’s rim.
Tell me about the girl, I asked.

| By Roger Thurow

Starting Early

The clamor begins just inside the door of Ridge Academy elementary school on Chicago’s south side.  Short essays and drawings shout out to all those who pass:

“Many people are dying now because of hunger.”


| By Roger Thurow

Fighting Hunger: Law of the Land

From across the pond, amid the sniping and bickering of the current election season in the United Kingdom, comes a worthy idea: enshrining in law the nation’s commitment to provide a certain level of foreign development aid.


| By Roger Thurow

All Together Now

It’s all the same really, the clamor over hunger, climate change and environmental preservation.  The common goal: improve food production and nutritional quality to feed the planet’s ever-expanding and more prosperous population while adapting to climate change and protecting delicate eco-systems.

| By Roger Thurow

Defusing Threats

It was in the scary days of the Cold War when Norman Borlaug, a plant breeder from small-town Iowa, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.  An odd choice, perhaps, given the nuclear standoff at the time, but the Norwegian committee bestowing the award had a good reason.

| By Roger Thurow

The Hungry Can't Eat Words

A blunt reminder of the task at hand came from Europe this week, aimed at the powers-that-be in the Group of Eight leading industrial countries, also known as the G8:

“Declarations, commitments and speeches don’t feed hungry people.”


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Digital Preview of The First 1,000 Days

In his new book, The First 1,000 Days, Council senior fellow Roger Thurow illuminates the 1,000 Days initiative to end early childhood malnutrition through the compelling stories of new mothers in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago. Get a first-look at photos and stories from the book in this new web interactive.

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» Order your copy of the book.

Books

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow’s book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Learn more »

The Last Hunger Season

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers' lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world's growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO's, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Learn more »

EnoughEnough

Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

Learn more »