May 11, 2016

The First 1,000 Days: Guides for Discussion Groups and Teachers

On May 3, Roger Thurow released his latest book, The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and Children—And the World. Through compelling stories of new mothers and babies in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago, The First 1,000 Days explores the promise of—and confounding challenges to—a transformative worldwide initiative to end early childhood malnutrition.

The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting has created a number of educational modules to engage students and readers in Thurow’s work and generate awareness of the importance of good nutrition in the first 1,000 days. Explore these tools below, and pick up your copy of The First 1,000 Days at your local or online bookstore.

For high-school teachers:

A Common Core standards-aligned lesson plan with five extension activities. This tool incorporates text from the first chapter of the book, as well as videos and an interactive digital experience, to provide an introduction to The First 1,000 Days movement, and the mothers and children that Roger followed throughout his reporting.

A module focused on malnutrition in Guatemala, which uses material from The First 1,000 Days as well as PBS NewsHour anchor Hari Sreenivasan’s ”Guatemala: Hungry for Change” project. This module allows students to integrate and analyze information presented in different media or formats.

For all readers:

A set of discussion questions to engage readers of all ages in issues related to The First 1,000 Days movement.
 
 
For more information contact The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting at education@pulitzercenter.org

Archive

| By Roger Thurow

A Wondrous Journey

Cruising down I-80 in the summer is one of the most wondrous, and paradoxical, drives in the country.


| By Roger Thurow

1,000 Days and Migrant Stress

The first 1,000 days of a child's life is a critical time for development, where nutrition--and stability--lay the foundation for a lifetime. 



| By Roger Thurow

Outrage and Inspire with Roger Thurow - Am I About to Lose My Second Child, Too?

The latest podcast in our ongoing series with Roger Thurow. Hear how even the best nutrition projects can be undermined by bad water, poor sanitation and hygiene, and lousy infrastructure.  From northern Uganda, we hear a mother’s agony when her healthy, robust child suddenly falls ill after a few sips of water…unclean water, it turned out.











Roger Thurow on SDG 2.2

Roger Thurow sat down with Farming First to talk about the individual and societal consequences of malnutrition. 



Multimedia

Videos


 


Digital Preview of The First 1,000 Days

In his new book, The First 1,000 Days, Council senior fellow Roger Thurow illuminates the 1,000 Days initiative to end early childhood malnutrition through the compelling stories of new mothers in Uganda, India, Guatemala, and Chicago. Get a first-look at photos and stories from the book in this new web interactive.

» Learn more.
» Order your copy of the book.

Books

The First 1,000 Days

Roger Thurow’s book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Learn more »

The Last Hunger Season

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers' lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world's growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO's, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Learn more »

EnoughEnough

Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

Learn more »