January 25, 2019

Wait Just a Minute: US Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi

Wait Just a Minute asks experts to answer complex questions about global affairs in 60 seconds. In this episode, US Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi, a Council Emerging Leader Program alum,  answers questions on the top global challenges facing the United States and what issues will be the most important during the 2020 presidential race.

Wait Just a Minute: Raja Krishnamoorthi


Top global challenge facing the United States?

I think one of the biggest challenges that we have is how do we protect democracies, and how do we protect those who might be somehow adversely affected by the authoritarian regimes that are popping up around the world.

Biggest impact of President Trump's trade policies?

I think everybody shares a belief that countries like China really are engaging in unfair trade practices. Now, we have to figure out, if we go down the tariff route, where does this end?

What's the most important global issiue in the 2020 presidential race?

Further discuss climate change, which is a global issue not only involving the environment, but also trade, and commerce, and the economies of the world.

What are you reading right now?

I just finished a really good book called "Start-Up Nation." It's the story of how Israel is home to an unusually large concentration of start-up companies in the world.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive





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