October 11, 2018

Wait Just a Minute: Time's Up Leader Tina Tchen

Our web series, Wait Just a Minute, asks experts to answer complex questions about global affairs in 60 seconds. In this episode, Time's Up leader and former Chief of Staff to Michelle Obama, Tina Tchen, shares her favorite thing about working with the former First Lady, the challenges of building Time's Up, and advice for young women starting their careers.

Wait Just a Minute: Tina Tchen


Best thing about working with Michelle Obama?

So, it's hard to isolate one thing that I enjoyed the most about working with Mrs. Obama, but I think, you know, we had a great team. I think the thing that both of us treasure from our time in the White House, and also on the campaigns, was the spirit of a team that came together to support a cause.

Biggest challenge in building Time's Up?

I think the biggest challenge in building Time's Up has just been to keep up with the momentum. I think we were all surprised by the outpouring of support, and, quite frankly, the outpouring of people needing help. So, just keeping up with that over the course of the last year has been a challenge. 

When do you think women will "get there"?

This is a longtime struggle, when I talk about women's rights I often say, you know, gender discrimination is something that has been with us for a millennia. It has transcended time, and religion, and culture, geography, age... it has been with us since the beginning of time, so it's going to take a while to overcome.

Advice for young women starting their careers?

The most important thing is to believe in yourself, believe in your own capabilities, believe in your voice, and then use it.

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Urban Reflections from the 2019 International Student Delegation

Each year approximately 30 students from leading research universities around the world participate in the global student delegation program at the Pritzker Forum on Global Cities. Promising students who have demonstrated a commitment to improving global cities and are enrolled in a master’s or PhD program are nominated by their host universities to attend. The 2019 delegation included 30 students from 20 countries, including China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Germany, Israel, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. Their biographies are available here.

The following series of contributions are their reflections and insights inspired by and drawn from their experience attending the 2019 Pritzker Forum.


| By Lille van der Zanden

Social Equity: The Legacy of 100 Resilient Cities

On July 31, 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) officially ceased its operations, marking a turning point in the modern urban resiliency movement to create cities that can bounce back from disaster. In six years, the Rockefeller Foundation-funded initiative brought a standardized urban resilience framework to cities across the globe, facilitating the development of more than 80 resilience plans in the process. As a result of its work, urban resiliency planning has become a common practice for city governments, with many institutionalizing the position of a chief resiliency officer.




| By Ian Klaus

Will Ambassador Subnat Go to Washington?

On June 28, 2019, Congressmen Ted W. Lieu (D-CA33) and Joe Wilson (R-SC02) introduced H.R.3571, the “City and State Diplomacy Act.” The Act seeks to mandate a senior official at the State Department charged with “supervision (including policy oversight of resources) of Federal support for subnational engagements by State and municipal governments with foreign governments.” The position would be at the ambassadorial level, and “Ambassador Subnat” would require the consent of the Senate and oversee a new Office of Subnational Diplomacy.