February 15, 2019

Wait Just a Minute: John Mearsheimer

In our latest episode of Wait Just a Minute, John Mearsheimer, University of Chicago professor and co-director of the university’s Program on International Security Policy, explains what he thinks is wrong with the liberal hegemonic worldview, why he believes realism serves as a better lens, and whom he’d most like to debate on the subject.

Wait Just a Minute: John Mearsheimer


What is liberal hegemony?

Liberal hegemony is the foreign policy that the United States has pursued since the end of the Cold War. And, basically, what liberal hegemony is all about is remaking the world in America's image.

Why is realism a better way to look at the world?

Realism is a better way to look at the world because realism says that the balance of power matters. And for any country that is interested in surviving in international politics that country has to pay attention to the balance of power.

Why is nationalism important?

Nationalism is important because it is simply the most powerful political ideology on the planet. Nationalism is important because it is simply the most powerful political ideology on the planet. The world is populated with nation-states. And that word, "nation-state," embodies nationalism.

Who would you most like to debate?

I'd think I'd like to debate Madeleine Albright. She really believes in American primacy, and she believes that liberal hegemony is the best foreign policy to pursue. And, of course, I believe she's wrong.

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