April 10, 2019 | By Ertharin Cousin

Wait Just a Minute: Ertharin Cousin

In this episode of Wait Just a Minute, Council distinguished fellow and former executive director of the World Food Programme, Ertharin Cousin explains the difference between outbreaks, pandemics, and epidemics; what's changed since the Ebola outbreak in 2014 and the one happening today; and how political instability impacts health systems.

Wait Just a Minute: Ertharin Cousin


How do an outbreak, an epidemic, and a pandemic differ?

A disease outbreak is when a disease occurs in larger numbers than anticipated in a particular community or particular season. An epidemic is when those numbers are large in that particular community. And a pandemic is when that disease outbreak is global.

How does the current ebola outbreak differ from the one in 2014?

The basic difference is that there're protocols, vaccines, and processes in place to support the response in an effective manner. Biggest challenge is that you're responding in a conflict situation, which means that the risk levels for those who are responding, as well as the community, are much higher.

How does politcal instability affect global health systems?

Lack of political leadership will hinder the communication that is necessary to build the trust that's required between, particularly, external health responders and the community that is potentially impacted by disease.

What gives you hope?

While communication is a challenge, it's better than it's ever been in the history of the global community.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive


| By J. Thomas Chapin

J. Thomas Chapin: Batteries as the Base of the City

"It seems as if batteries, more specifically lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, are everywhere," J. Thomas Chapin, vice president of research at UL, explained at the 2019 Pritzker Forum on Global Cities in Chicago



Wait Just a Minute: Jess Fanzo

Jess Fanzo, professor of food policy and ethics and editor-in-chief of Global Food Security Journal, takes a minute to answer questions on why obesity is rising across the globe and what can be done about it.


| By Ian Klaus

Mind the Knowledge Gaps: What Global Conferences Bring to Light

Despite the vast amount of research and data available, it shouldn’t be surprising that large gaps in urban knowledge persist. After all, there are many cities—according to the IPCC and UN data, there are around 1000 urban agglomerations with populations of 500,000 or greater—and cities remain difficult to know.





Wait Just a Minute: Klaus Schwab

Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum (WEF), takes a minute to answer questions about the fourth industrial revolution and what it means for globalization and equality. 




| By Amy Webb

Wait Just a Minute: Amy Webb

Futurist Amy Webb, founder of the Future Today Institute and NYU professor, takes a minute to answer questions about artificial intelligence and whether its advancement is in the long-term interest of humanity.


| By Brian Hanson, Penny Abeywardena, Henri-Paul Normandin

Deep Dish: City Diplomacy on the Rise

As cities grow in size and power, and as technology and globalization further lower the cost of connecting across distances, local governments are increasingly shaping their own diplomatic agendas independent from national governments.