April 17, 2017 | By Cécile Shea

Unilateral Action in North Korea

Cecile Shea explains the consequences of unilateral American military action in North Korea.

 

"There are a number of risks involved in the U.S. taking unilateral action in North Korea There is the possibility that the North Koreans would rain artillery shells down on Seoul. They could destroy Seoul in a couple of hours without using any nuclear weapons, just conventional weapons. There's a risk to Japan in terms of sabotage, in terms of submarine attacks, in terms of sleeper agents, in the country committing horrific attacks. But really the most sensitive area is China. If China believes there are U.S. forces moving into North Korea, that the U.S. is planning to somehow invade North Korea, they will get very, very nervous. Because they absolutely, positively, cannot abide the U.S. military being in North Korea when North Korea has a very long border with China. So that is by far the most sensitive issue for the United States. It is that ensuring that if we do, if President Trump does decide to take some action against the North, that the Chinese are not going to react very very badly and perhaps increase tensions in the region."

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