June 26, 2017

Top 5 "One More Question" Videos

The Council works hard to bring the brightest minds to Chicago to share their ideas on important global issues. With so much to discuss, it is sometimes difficult to fit all that there is to say on a subject into a single event. That's why we invited several of our guests to answer questions that may have gone unanswered. We’ve been releasing these brief interviews as part of our One More Question series. Discover our top five most popular episodes to date.
 

One More Question with Saudi Foreign Minister Adel-al Jubeir
 


 
 

 

"I believe the United States and Saudi Arabia should work more closely together on stabilizing the region. Because a stable Middle East is a positive tool of the international order. A stable Middle East will allow us to eradicate extremism and terrorism. A stable Middle East will allow us to prevent Iran from expanding its influence further in the region."


One More Question with Writer Sarah Kendzior

 

"I don't think that we're in a post-truth era. I think that's something that the Trump administration wants people to believe. If we were in a post-truth era they wouldn't be so committed to suppressing the truth, to persecuting those who investigate and to seek—you know, who seek facts and truth. So I think the worst case scenario is that we accept this idea and abandon the idea of finding out facts, investigating the administration. And the best case is that you know people continue to do so, despite the fact that the administration clearly doesn't want that. And perhaps manage to, you know, find something that may turn the tide in the future."

One More Question with Journalist Fareed Zakaria


 

 

"I wish somebody in the audience would ask: Aside from the Middle East, what's going on in the world? And how does the world look? I know it sounds as though, when people think about ISIS and Islamic terrorism, that I'm, you know the old line—aside from that Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play? But it really isn't...because the Middle East is just one part of the world. It's about 300 million people, out of a global population of seven and a half billion. It's actually not that important economically. It is of declining importance strategically as the United States becomes essentially energy independent. And yet it defines entirely the way we think about the world. The trend lines in the Middle East are negative. The place is a mess. But, if you look at what's going on in Asia. If you look at the rise of India—a democratic country, increasingly pro-American. Indonesia, which has just elected a businessman, pro-reform president. Japan, which continues to try to make reforms. Even China, which in its own ways, has been opening up. These are all very positive trends. If you look at Latin America—where countries like Argentina are turning the corner and reentering and reintegrating into the world. Mexico remains very strongly pro-reform, pro-American, despite our—or at least, some insults being hurled at it from outside of the border. So basically—Africa, another place where things are—many, many good things are happening. Basically, there are many positive, optimistic trend lines in the world, aside from the Middle East."

One More Question with Former Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Ya'alon


 

 

"To go on with the superb relationship between the two defense establishments, but to share in a better way the assessment as we believe regarding the situation in the Middle East. As we live there, we know what's going on there, there is opportunity to have open channels in a better way to discuss our common challenges in the Middle East."

One More Question with London Mayor Sadiq Khan
 


 

 

"One global issue I think that needs to be challenged and addressed—particularly by global cities—is issues around air quality, air pollution, and climate change. I think the reality is most people live in cities. It's mayors around the world that have got to grapple with the issue of pollution and climate change. So in London for example—almost 10,000 Londoners died last year because of poor quality air—air pollution. There are children in parts of London whose lungs are underdeveloped. I've got a responsibility to try and fix the air in London. Whether that's taking off the streets, the most polluting vehicles. Making clean vehicles. Having an incentive and a carrot to, you know, use electric cars. Making sure that public transport and buses are powered by electric, hydrogen, or hybrid. It's a problem that needs to be grappled with. We've got a choice. We can be the last generation that doesn't get it—or the first generation that gets it. I want to be the first generation that gets it. "

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive


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