October 5, 2016

Salam Al-Marayati on the Biggest Global Issue Facing the Next President

Salam Al-Marayati, president and cofounder of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, spoke at the Council's Sept. 23 event, "Rebalancing Immigration and National Security." There, we sat down one-on-one with him to inquire what he thought was the biggest foreign policy or global issue facing the next president. Find out what he said.

 

"One of the main issues that's going to face the next president—and probably the next three or four presidents—is going to be the issue of terrorism and how we handle the problem of terrorism. And rather than dealing with it as a symptom, we should look at it as: 'What are the root causes that lead to that symptom?' And one major issue is the lack of strong, central governance, especially in the Middle East. If you look at the issue of, for example, ISIS, and how it spawned in an area where there is no strong, central government. It's either a dictatorship or there's anarchy. And from that you have a rise of militias, gangs, and terrorist groups. So dealing with central governance, and helping the people form a strong apparatus for self-governance, I think will help stem the tide of terrorism over there and make America a partner with the people in dealing with that problem of terrorism."

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The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

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