January 26, 2017

One More Question with Sarah Kendzior

Globe and Mail columnist Sarah Kendzior joined an expert panel at the Council on January 19 to discuss media and democracy in a post-truth era. We asked her for the best and worst case scenarios on how the media landscape may evolve—watch her response.

 

"I don't think that we're in a post-truth era. I think that's something that the Trump administration wants people to believe. If we were in a post-truth era they wouldn't be so committed to suppressing the truth, to persecuting those who investigate and to seek—you know, who seek facts and truth. So I think the worst case scenario is that we accept this idea and abandon the idea of finding out facts, investigating the administration. And the best case is that you know people continue to do so, despite the fact that the administration clearly doesn't want that. And perhaps manage to, you know, find something that may turn the tide in the future."

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The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

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