April 17, 2017

One More Question with Arthur Brooks

Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, explains why he thinks the real argument for globalization is humanitarian. 

 

"In my business, in the think tank world, I find that people talk about globalization all the time but they don't usually make the best argument for it. They talk about the GDP growth implications or what it costs to particular economies when jobs are going overseas, but the most important argument for globalization is fundamentally humanitarian. When I was a kid we used to think that global poverty was an insoluble problem, that nothing could ever be done. But if you look at the difference between when I was a child and today, there's been an eighty percent decline in the world's worst poverty, in the percentage of the world's population living on a dollar a day or less. Two billion of our brothers and sisters have been pulled out of poverty, and there are five reasons for it: Globalization, free trade, property rights, the rule of law, and the spread of American-style entrepreneurship around the world. This is literally our gift to the world. And if we want to get the next two billion people, people that are really-- they're us around the world--but this hasn't reached them yet, then we have to spread these things even harder this is not about what it does to American GDP today, this is what the world is going to look like over the next 50 years and literally it's in our hands. That's the argument for globalization."

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive

| By Ivo H. Daalder

This Week’s Reads

Council President Ivo H. Daalder shares some recommended reads to shed important light on the global headlines this week.

| By Ivo H. Daalder

This Week’s Reads

Council President Ivo H. Daalder shares some recommended reads to shed important light on the global headlines this week.

| By Simon Curtis

A Foreign Policy for Global Cities?

Nonresident senior fellow Simon Curtis examines whether political paralysis on multiple issues at the national level should drive global cities to develop and advance their own foreign policy.



| By Saeid Golkar

Iran’s Secret (Weapon) Society

While the nuclear deal has been reached, US policymakers and their allies should not overlook the power of Iran's Basij—the largest civil militia on the planet.

| By Michael Tiboris

Global Goals: Can We Do More and Better with Less?

The greatest threat to the UN's Sustainable Development Goals is not likely to be the failure of the developing world, but the unwillingness of the developed world to do its part in moving toward sustainable consumption and production.



Pragmatic Perspectives from the Church

President Obama and Pope Francis discussed US immigration reform this morning at the Vatican during a nearly hour long conversation that touched on numerous social and economic issues. The Pope is compassionate for the plight of migrants, speaking out and calling attention to those who died crossing the Mediterranean from Africa when he visited the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa. In the United States, leaders in the Catholic Church also have been thinking hard and clearly about immigration, as seen at a recent conference at the University of Notre Dame.