December 19, 2017 | By Craig Kafura

O Christmas Tree

Christmas is a widely-celebrated holiday in the United States, and the Christmas season is in full swing. Here in Chicago the trees on Michigan Avenue are decked out with lights, buildings around the city have sprouted giant wreathes and bows, and Christmas trees can be seen in windows everywhere.

According to a new study from the Pew Research Center, nine in ten Americans (90%) will celebrate Christmas, with most Americans planning to gather with friends and family, and roughly half planning to attend religious services. The study finds that Americans are slowly shifting to viewing the Christmas holiday as more of a cultural holiday than a religious one.

Another shift in Americans’ celebration of Christmas is the Christmas tree. Though the symbol remains a popular one, Americans are changing the kind of tree they use in their homes—and a small but rising number are opting to celebrate without a tree altogether.

In 1989, a Gallup poll found that nearly nine in ten Americans (85%) planned to have a tree at home, with a plurality of Americans (45%) planning on using a real tree. Since then, the popularity of artificial trees has risen steadily. In a December 2006 CNN poll, half of Americans (53%) said they would have an artificial tree in their home this Christmas. 

But real trees still have their appeal. According to a Nielsen survey commissioned by the National Christmas Tree Association, Americans spent $2.4 billion dollars on real Christmas trees last year, 77% of which were pre-cut and 23% of which allowed Americans to put axe to wood and chop them down themselves. The trees are so popular that this year, there’s even a nationwide tree shortage.

Also notable is the slow rise of those Americans who plan to celebrate Christmas without a tree. Though only seven percent planned to do so in 1989, a CNN/ORC poll in 2014 found that nearly two in ten (18%) planned to celebrate Christmas but without a tree. Perhaps they’re hoisting a Festivus pole, or decorating with holly and berries for Saturnalia. 

Personally, I went for a small, table-sized real tree this year. 

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| By Craig Kafura

O Christmas Tree

Christmas is a widely-celebrated holiday in the United States. Though the Christmas tree remains a popular symbol, Americans are changing the kind of tree they use in their homes—and a small but rising number are opting to celebrate without a tree altogether.