September 12, 2019 | By Katelyn Jones

Wait Just a Minute: Katelyn Jones

Council Women, Peace, and Security Fellow Katelyn Jones takes a minute to answer questions on equality, equity, diversity, and inclusion.

Wait Just a Minute: Kaitlyn Jones


What's the difference between equality and equity?

Equality is giving everyone the same thing. But equity is giving everyone the opportunity to be successful. So, to do that, you actually have to pay attention to the ways that historic legacies and current discriminations affect marginalized people.

Define diversity.

A demographic mix among a collection of people. And typically in those demographics we think about things like ethnocultural and racial groups, as well as women, LGBTQIA+ persons, and people with disabilities, as well as other marginalized persons being represented in that collection.

How can we measure diversity and inclusion?

So, diversity is pretty easy to measure, it's just a matter of counting the number of people that fall into different demographic categories. But inclusion is a bit trickier. So, to understand how inclusive a given environment is you actually have to talk to people. You have to understand how comfortable they are bringing their entire selves to work and identifying ways that they feel included, as well as ways that they might be feeling excluded in a given space to determine how inclusive or not it may be.

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The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

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