September 26, 2019

Wait Just a Minute: Dr. Alaa Murabit

In this episode of Wait Just a Minute, Dr. Alaa Murabit, a UN High-Level Commissioner on Health Employment and Economic Growth, takes a minute to answer questions on gender equality, its role in global security, what part education plays in promoting gender equality, and what individuals can do to promote gender equality as well.

Wait Just a Minute: Dr. Alaa Murabit


How does gender equality impact global security?

Ninety percent of of peace processes fail within five years. When we have gender inclusion at the agenda setting phase, there's a 35 percent higher chance they're going to last 15 years. And what that allows for is, you know, 15 years more or less of social growth, of infrastructure, of schooling, of healthcare, of all of these things which actually build and sustain economic growth and social change, and prevent the likelihood of conflict and crisis down the line.

What is the role of education in promoting gender equality?

If you are to educate 10 percent of the girls of a country, you're looking at a 2 to 3 percent GDP growth. And if we were to equally educate and employ girls and women, we're looking at a greater economic boost than China and India combined. So it is the most significant economic lever we have.

What can idividuals do now to promote gender equality?

The vast majority of change happens in our own homes and communities, and so if we can each look at the spaces where we hold power, if we can each look at the spheres of power and who we impact and who we influence, and we can leverage our own credibility, and our own networks, and our own resources, and own voice to ensure that other people are in the room.

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