January 9, 2020 | By Kelly Magsamen, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: Iran's Retaliation Against the US Is Not One and Done

A demonstrator holds the picture of Qassem Soleimani during a protest against the assassination of the Iranian Major-General Qassem Soleimani, head of the elite Quds Force, and Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis who were killed in an air strike

Earlier this week, in retaliation for the killing of Iranian commander Qasem Soleimani, Iran fired a dozen missiles on two bases in Iraq housing US troops. After, President Trump said Iran "appears to be standing down." But Kelly Magsamen, NSC director for Iran under US presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama and now at the Center for American Progress, explains on Deep Dish that the repercussions of killing Soleimani will be felt for days, months, and even years to come.

Read Kelly Magsamen's latest essay in Foreign Affairs, "How to Avoid Another War in the Middle East."

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