September 20, 2018

#AskIvo: How Does 'The Empty Throne' Affect US Alliances?

"Will the current administration have long-term effects on US alliances and influence, or do you believe there can be a course correction?" Council President Ivo Daalder shares his response in this edition of #AskIvo. Be sure to submit your question for the next episode to @IvoHDaalder using #AskIvo.

Pre-order "The Empty Throne: America's Abdication of Global Leadership" by Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay here: https://bit.ly/2ODULnH

#AskIvo: How Does 'The Empty Throne' Affect US Alliances?

Transcript:

This is Ask Ivo, a series where you get to ask me questions on global issues of concern to you. Today, Robert asks: "Will the current administration's foreign policy have long-term effects on US alliances and influence?"

That's a great question Robert. In fact, one that Jim Lindsay and I both asked and answered in our new book, "The Empty Throne: America's Abdication of Global Leadership." This administration's foreign policy, and this president's foreign policy, is focused on winning, rather than leading, and it is trying to win, not only against our adversaries, but against our allies. Countries in Europe, in Asia, and in North America. We're trying to get the best possible trade deal, not for both of us, but just for ourselves. We want allies to spend more on defense so we can spend less.

Those are major shifts in American foreign policy compared to what we have been doing for the past 70 years, and they are having consequences. Allies have choices–They can either be with us, or they can try to do stuff without us. On trade, they're negotiating agreements among themselves and leaving the United States outside. In Europe, more countries are not only spending more on defense, but are trying to do it without having to rely on the United States. That isn't good for the United States, and it isn't good for our allies. But not all is lost. Allies can and will do more, and the next President of the United States can come back and lead the United States once again and be part of a global order that has allies and where America has influence.

That's the essence of our book, and I hope you have a chance to read it. Thanks for tuning in! Want to ask me a question? Shoot me a tweet, with the #AskIvo.

 

 

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