June 7, 2018

Issues Illustrated: Global Cities

Wondering what is all this hype about global cities? There are several things you need to know about global cities, starting with the fact that you’re probably living in one. Nearly one billion people reside in 60 global cities. Yet, size alone does not make a global city. Watch the first episode of our new video series Issues Illustrated to learn what does.

Issues Illustrated: Global Cities

 

Transcript:

Global cities, the biggest future trend you've never heard of. Well, besides 4D printers, Google gas, wireless clotheslines, and something called ploxxing, whatever that is. There are several things you should know about global cities starting with the fact that you're probably living in one.

Nearly 1 billion people reside in 60 global cities. Although most global cities have large populations, size isn't all that matters. Let me explain. You know those giant keys cities give to heroes and celebrities? Fun fact, Saddam Hussein was handed the key to Detroit in the 1980s. Yeah, that happened. Anyway, here are some key facts to know about global cities.

First, global cities drive the global economy. They are economic powerhouses with head offices, business services, legal and consulting expertise, exchanges, banks, and global corporations. Second, they drive connectivity. Major airports and solid transit infrastructure make global cities accessible. That helps attract tourists, who in Chicago, preserve our bean selfie industry and keep Navy Pier in business.

Thirdly, global cities unlock knowledge through top educational institutions, consulates, think tanks-- shameless plug-- and international conferences, which in turn, drives political engagement. The fourth reason global cities matter, is because they are cultural capitals. Museums, symphonies, world renowned restaurants, nightlife, sports, you name it, even ploxxing. You can find your fix in a global city.

Number five, global cities are led by people who think globally and understand the importance of connecting local politics to world politics. Sometimes mayors solve problems that national leaders can't. Finally, global cities are open. Businesses, ideas, and people flow freely. They certainly don't put up walls. And if they do, it's probably part of some modern art exhibit representing the barriers we create within ourselves, within our own hearts.

So there you have it. Hopefully, you now have a better understanding of what global cities are and how they are poised to shape our world and our future. Thanks for watching. Catch the next episode of "Issues Illustrated" on our Facebook page, YouTube channel, or website.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

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