August 4, 2016

How Has the Iran Nuclear Deal Changed the US-Iran Relationship?

One year after the signing of the Iran nuclear deal, the future of the US-Iran relationship remains unclear. Weighing in on whether the deal has led to a lasting shift are career ambassadors Thomas Pickering and James F. Jeffrey who spoke at the Council's June 27 event, "The Iran Deal: A Reassessment."

 

James F. Jeffrey, former US Ambassador to Albania, Iraq, and Turkey

It's changed it in several ways. First of all, there is a better level of communication between the two. Even though I'm, by profession, a retired diplomat, I don't see that as a be all and end all of international relations or foreign policy. But it is in and of itself a good thing. Secondly, Iran as a country—I'm quoting Henry Kissinger here, Iran has to decide whether it's a cause or a country....As a country, an argument to participate, at least partially, in the international system, that doesn't end all of our—necessarily end—all of our problems with Iran. China and Russia are major participants in the international system and we have even greater status quo problems with them. But it can move it a little bit in that direction.
 

Thomas Pickering, former US Ambassador to Israel, Russia, and the United Nations

We've probably had more communication with Iran in the last two years than we have had in the last 100 years. But certainly in the period since the Iranian revolution in '78 and '79, when we had almost no communication. And while communication, in itself, is not the answer to all the problems, the absence of communication makes problem-solving a lot more difficult.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive



| By Rana Foroohar, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: Hard Truths about Big Tech and the US Economy

Facebook, Google, Amazon, and Apple are massive companies, commanding so much of the market that they are now being called monopolies. Rana Foroohar explains how these data-fueled tech behemoths are disrupting the US economy and American politics.



| By Derek Mitchell, Daniel Twining, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: The Case for America to Promote Democracy Abroad

Democratic breakdown in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the resurgence of authoritarian leaders around the world, suggest that democracy promotion is a failed project. But the United States still has an essential role to play in promoting democratic institutions abroad, argue Ambassador Derek Mitchell and Daniel Twining.




Wait Just a Minute: Graeme Woods

Journalist Graeme Wood, author of The Way of the Strangers: Encounters With the Islamic State, takes a minute to discuss the difference between ISIS and Al Qaeda, and if ISIS has truly been defeated.




Wait Just a Minute: Dr. Alaa Murabit

Dr. Alaa Murabit, a UN High-Level Commissioner on Health Employment and Economic Growth, takes a minute to answer questions on gender equality, its role in global security, what part education plays in promoting gender equality, and what individuals can do to promote gender equality as well.