October 26, 2016

Election 2016: What Do You Think America's Role in the World Should Be?

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is engaging the public and thought leaders in dialogue critical to the 2016 presidential election. In part two of our “Election 2016: America in the World” video series, find out what the public thinks America's role in the world should be. In case you missed it, watch part one.

 

Lindell R.

"I think we should stand as a leader, and not just look at our domestic issues, but also look into foreign issues and how we can assist. But not try to overpower, and try and take control."

Jasmine C.

"I mean, I do think we should help out others but we also have problems here, in America, that we need to solve."

Eric M.

"Well the one thing that we have learned from the 2008 collapse is that everything is connected. So, our contribution or our—you know, our part should be collectively trying to work to make the world better, rather than compete and isolate against each other."

Kevin M.

"We definitely need to be a productive member of the world economy, that uses whatever influence we have to hopefully promote more social...social good."

Joanne K. 

"As, you know, as a role model, we had a period where America really took—right after World War II and the creation of Bretton Woods—we had a clear leadership of, you know, not only would this be beneficial for America but this would be beneficial for the other surrounding countries in order to build each other up globally not just build themselves up globally."

Jabare N.

"America should just continue to be great and help any other country that needs it, if we have it to help."

Saffa K.

"We take it for granted that a lot of people look towards America and look up to America and we are slightly losing our footing in that respect."

Hank F.

"I think our primary goal, other than like, our military power, should be humanitarian aid."

Saleem S.

"A trusted adviser, as opposed to the local cop."

Tami M.

"I think we should be a leader, yet, cognizant of other cultures and other beliefs, and, what is right for us doesn't necessarily mean it's right for another country and their people."

Glen G.

"I think we should be a world leader and real involved. And I think that the world looks to us for leadership—in regard, from environment to military to peace."

What do you think America's role in the world should be? Let us know on Twitter and Facebook.

 

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive










| By Michael H. Moskow

Michael H. Moskow on 'American Hero' Paul Volcker

Paul A. Volcker, chairman of the Federal Reserve under Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, died earlier this week. The Council's Michael H. Moskow shares his insights on why Volcker is an 'American hero' for his work in monetary policy and public service.




Wait Just a Minute: Elisabeth Braw on Cyber Warfare

Elisabeth Braw, director of the Royal United Services Institute’s Modern Deterrence Project, takes a minute to examine which countries are best at cybersecurity and whether a cyberattack is an act of war.


| By Sushant Singh, Paul Staniland, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: Which Side Will India Take in US-China Rivalry?

A centerpiece of US strategy during the Trump administration has been the idea of the "Indo-Pacific," a massive single region stretching across both the Pacific and Indian Oceans. One of the goals in this strategy is to link up India with US allies in East Asia as a counterbalance to a rising China.