July 18, 2019 | By Robert Pape, Ellen Laipson, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: Iran Reacts to US Sanctions—with Echoes of Run-up to Pearl Harbor

US sanctions on Iran are shifting the strategic calculus for Tehran to retaliate, creating a situation reminiscent of the sequence in 1941 that led Imperial Japan to attack the US naval base in Hawaii, argues Robert Pape of the University of Chicago. Ellen Laipson of George Mason University, too, warns about the White House neglecting the risks of economic coercion when it fails. Both join this week's Deep Dish to discuss what is at stake with Iran. 

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