October 13, 2016 | By Brian Hanson, Sara McElmurry, Craig Kafura

Deep Dish - Episode 3: Immigration and National Security

Immigration and national security have been salient topics in this year’s election, but until now they’ve been conspicuously absent from the presidential debates. With both topics set for discussion in the third debate, vice president of studies Brian Hanson sat down with Council immigration expert Sara McElmurry and polling expert Craig Kafura to discuss common-sense immigration reforms that could find consensus during the next administration. Listen here.

 

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The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

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| By Ian Klaus

Did the UNSG Say “Revolution”?

While there is nothing convenient about 2020, the upcoming Pritzker Forum on Global Cities has been helpfully anticipated by a series of publications that speak to the high stakes currently in play in cities around the world and the urgent need - from the perspective of both efficacy and equity - to adapt governance practices.








| By Laurence Ralph, Thomas Abt, Brian Hanson

Deep Dish: Police Reform Lessons from Around the World

Princeton University’s Laurence Ralph and the Council on Criminal Justice’s Thomas Abt join Deep Dish to explain why police brutality is not a uniquely American phenomenon and argue the strongest examples of successful police reform come from outside the United States.