November 1, 2018 | By Ivo H. Daalder

#AskIvo: Will Everything Blow Over With Saudi Arabia?

This week, Council President Ivo Daalder answers the question, "Will everything blow over with Saudi Arabia and will ties stay strong between Washington and Riyadh?" See Ivo's response in the latest installment of #AskIvo. Also, be sure submit your question on Twitter for the next episode to @IvoHDaalder using #AskIvo.

#AskIvo: Will Everything Blow Over With Saudi Arabia?


Transcript

I am Ivo Daalder, president of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, and this is #AskIvo, a series where you get to ask me questions on global issues of concern to you.

This question came during a recent program releasing my new book with Jim Lindsay called “The Empty Throne,” and the question is: Will everything blow over with Saudi Arabia and will ties stay strong between Washington and Riyadh?

It's a timely and important question. The reality is that the murder of the Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi was one of the most blatant human rights violations we've seen in a long time. There's very little doubt in my mind that it happened because it was ordered at the top. And increasingly we now face a question of what kind of relationship the United States will have with a country whose leaders are murdering their citizens on foreign soil.

At the very least, we can't go back to business as usual. It's high time that the Unite States stopped supporting the war that the Saudis are leveling against Yemen, which has led to indiscriminate destruction of civilians throughout that country and the worst humanitarian crisis in the world according to the United Nations. We need to come to a situation in which the United States no longer slavishly follows whatever the Saudi leadership does, but starts to stand up for our own interests. There will be times when the United States and Saudi Arabia will of course agree, whether it's on questions of Iran, or the broader Middle East, or how to deal with Syria.

But there are also times when we have to stand up for our values, when it is important to remind our partners that to be a partner of the United States means, at the very least, you treat your citizens with a degree of fairness and human dignity that all of them need. So, the future of the relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia will be determined by how Riyadh behaves.

Thanks for tuning in. If you want to ask me a question, shoot me a tweet with #AskIvo.

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

Archive





| By Derek Scissors

Wait Just a Minute: Derek Scissors

Derek Scissors, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, takes a minute to answer questions about the economies of China, India, and the United States.




| By Sade Bamimore

The Circular Economy and Global Cities

One of the newest and most ambitious approaches to combating climate change seeks to eliminate the concept of waste. It's known as the circular economy.



| By Raghuram Rajan

Wait Just a Minute: Raghuram Rajan

In this episode, Former Governor of the Reserve Bank of India Raghuram Rajan takes a minute to explain what bananas reveal about markets and governments, the importance of communities in economics, and whether China or India has a more enviable economy. 



| By Brian Hanson, Steven A. Cook, Mustafa Akyol

Deep Dish: Will Erdogan or NATO Survive Longer in Turkey?

President Erdogan’s long-dominant political party lost elections in Ankara and Istanbul last week. At the same time, a dispute between Washington and Ankara over Turkey buying Russian weapons has hurt ties between the NATO allies.


| By Ertharin Cousin

Wait Just a Minute: Ertharin Cousin

In this episode, Council distinguished fellow Ertharin Cousin explains the difference between outbreaks, pandemics, and epidemics; what's changed since the Ebola outbreak in 2014 and the one happening today; and how political instability impacts health systems.