May 3, 2018

#AskIvo: Are We in a New Cold War with Russia?

Council President Ivo Daalder (@IvoHDaalder), former US ambassador to NATO, answers your questions on pressing global affairs and foreign policy issues in our new video series #AskIvo. For this first episode, we invited Council intern Natalie Pertsovsky (@natperts) to submit a question. She asked, “Are we in a new Cold War with Russia?” Submit your question for the next episode to @IvoHDaalder using #AskIvo.

#AskIvo: Are We in a New Cold War with Russia? (Edited)

 

Transcript:
I'm Ivo Daalder, president of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. And this is #AskIvo, a new series where you get to ask me a question on any global issue that may be of concern to you. Today, we have a question from @natperts. "Are we in a new Cold War with Russia?"

That's a great question. We're certainly not in a hot war, which is a good thing. But we're also not in the kind of Cold War that we had in the 1940s and '50s and '60s when two large armies were confronting each other and they were fighting over what ideology–communism or democracy–was going to win. Instead, what we have in Vladimir Putin is a disruptor of the international order and somebody who is trying to undermine the unity of Europe and the unity of the Transatlantic Alliance.

He invaded Crimea and Ukraine. He has been involved in military action in Syria. He has interfered in our elections here in 2016 and Europe in 2018 and 2017. And he used chemical weapons against somebody who he thought was a traitor of Russia. But he did it in Great Britain. This is the kind of man and the kind of country we are now dealing with. We're clearly in a big competition, even a confrontation, maybe even a Cold War. Whatever you want to call it, it's not a good thing.

Thanks for tuning in. You want to ask me a question? Shoot me a tweet with the hashtag #AskIvo.

 

 

About

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. We convene leading global voices and conduct independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is an independent, nonpartisan organization. All statements of fact and expressions of opinion in blog posts are the sole responsibility of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Council.

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