February 20, 2014

Roger Thurow - Outrage and Inspire - Gimme Nutrition

This post by senior fellow Roger Thurow originally appeared on the Outrage and Inspire blog. 



(Baby being weighed in Chuicavioc, Guatemala)

There are several reasons why Guatemala sits atop the Hunger and Nutrition Commitment Index, a ranking compiled by the Institute of Development Studies in the UK measuring the political and social commitment to reduce hunger and undernutrition in developing countries.

One, the Guatemalan government is beginning to implement a Zero Hunger Plan that aims to reduce chronic malnutrition in children less than five years of age by 10% by 2016. That would be quite a feat, since Guatemala has one of the world’s highest child stunting rates at 48%.

Two, the country’s influential public sector is backing the plan and has formed a business alliance against malnutrition, which annually diminishes Guatemala’s GDP by some 5%.

Three, the International Rabbits (Internacionales Conejos) are on the case. The Rabbits are arguably Guatemala’s most popular marimba band.  Working with the international humanitarian organization Save the Children, the Rabbits have provided a jaunty soundtrack to the national war on child stunting, which particularly emphasizes good nutrition, sanitation, and hygiene during the 1,000 days from when a women becomes pregnant to her child’s second birthday. After their hit song “Give the Breast,” about the importance of breastfeeding during the first six months, now comes the follow-up “Give Complementary Foods,” about the nutritional needs of children through two years.  Marimba has carried the health messages of the 1,000 days to the far reaches of the Western Highlands, where child malnutrition rates soar to 75%.

With the horns and drums and mayhem of marimba in mind, here are the lyrics to the songs, translated from the original Spanish.

Dale Pecho (Give the Breast)
Listen on YouTube.

For all the mothers, some advice from the International Rabbits…

It doesn’t matter where you live
nor does it matter how you live
But you have to listen, listen to the advice that I’m going to give you:
If you are pregnant, you should take good care of yourself
You have to feed yourself very well
And you should have very good hygiene

So that your kids grow up healthy
Give, give, the breast to the child
Only breast milk is good
Give, give, the breast to the child
If you want them to be an engineer
Give, give them their food

If you want them to be a good teacher
Give, give, them their food
For an abundant harvest
Give them the breast
Because from the time the child is born,
You should give them breast milk

Listen mama, from one to six months you should only give them breast milk

Whenever you are in your house
you should keep it very clean
Always wash your hands
before you eat
You should take good care of your kids
feed them and love them
Because when they grow up
They will have good health and strength

So that your kids grow up healthy
Give, give, the breast to the child
Only breast milk is good
Give, give, the breast to the child
So they don’t fail you in school
Give, give them their food

If you want to see them have energy
Give, give them their food
For an abundant harvest
Give them breast milk
Give, give, the breast to the child
And remember mama, from six months and onwards
you should give breast milk and complementary food to your children

Dale Comiditas (Give Complementary Foods)
Listen on YouTube.

And this is one more piece of advice, for all of the mothers from the International Rabbits…

Today I’ve come again to tell you
To care for your kids, don’t neglect them
If you already gave them the breast, don’t be afraid
from six to eight months you can start to give them
porridge, good and thick
It won’t hurt their little belly
Lots of fruits and veggies
They won’t hurt their little belly

After nine months, you can give them
Chicken liver, also beef
After twelve months give them everything
But never forget, to give them the breast

And happily they will grow,
don’t deny them their food
Give them their complementary food every day
With patience and with love
And they will grow, healthy and strong, intelligent,
full of life, health as well
They will be teachers or athletes,
Good workers and much more

And remember at 12 months you can give them goat milk

Today I’ve come again, to tell you
To care for your kids, don’t neglect them
If you already gave them the breast, don’t be afraid
from six to eight months you can start to give them
porridge, good and thick
It won’t hurt their little belly
Lots of fruits and veggies,
They won’t hurt their little belly

After nine months, you can start to give them
Little pieces of chicken, and of beef,
After twelve months give them everything
But never forget, to give them the breast

And happily they will grow,
don’t deny them their food
Give them complimentary foods daily
With patience and with love
And they will grow, healthy and strong, intelligent,
full of life, health as well
They will be teachers or athletes,
Good workers and much more

And don’t forget to give them their zucchini, squash, and carrots so they can be a good rabbit.

About

The Global Food and Agriculture Program aims to inform the development of US policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the US Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

The Global Food and Agriculture Program is housed within the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. The Council on Global Affairs convenes leading global voices and conducts independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

Support for the Global Food and Agriculture Program is generously provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Blogroll

1,000 Days Blog, 1,000 Days

Africa Can End Poverty, World Bank

Agrilinks Blog

Bread Blog, Bread for the World

Can We Feed the World Blog, Agriculture for Impact

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Institute Insights, Bread for the World Institute

End Poverty in South Asia, World Bank

Global Development Blog, Center for Global Development

The Global Food Banking Network

Harvest 2050, Global Harvest Initiative

The Hunger and Undernutrition Blog, Humanitas Global Development

International Food Policy Research Institute News, IFPRI

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center Blog, CIMMYT

ONE Blog, ONE Campaign

One Acre Fund Blog, One Acre Fund

Overseas Development Institute Blog, Overseas Development Institute

Oxfam America Blog, Oxfam America

Preventing Postharvest Loss, ADM Institute

Sense & Sustainability Blog, Sense & Sustainability

WFP USA Blog, World Food Program USA

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