November 21, 2017 | By Roger Thurow

Outrage and Inspire with Roger Thurow - A Child is Born. Discrimination Begins.

photo_podcast_its_a_girl.jpg

Shyamkali and her new daughter. Photo by the author.

 

With this podcast series, we open a new front in our storytelling, adding the magic of audio narratives to our writing, photos, and videos.  We’re calling this series: Outrage and Inspire, storytelling from the Real Hunger Games Trilogy of author and Chicago Council Senior Fellow Roger Thurow.

The central outrage of these stories is that we have brought famine, hunger, malnutrition, and stunting – such Medieval sufferings – with us into the 21st Century.  Yes, we have made progress over the past several decades, reducing by half the number of people dying of hunger.  We will certainly celebrate successes in our stories.  But still, three million children die every year of malnutrition and related diseases.  And what about those who survive, what becomes of them?  Well, one of every four children in our world today is stunted, either physically or mentally or both, from malnutrition in their earliest days and months and years.  And get this: about half of our planet’s entire population is malnourished in some manner – they are either chronically hungry (about 800 million people not getting enough calories for an active life every day); or micro-nutrient deficient (about two billion people lacking the proper vitamins and minerals in their diets for adequate growth of the brain or body); or severely overweight or obese (escalating toward two billion).

It is absurd, obscene – the darkest stain on our global conscience – that in our grand new Millennium, with so much incredible technology and communications capability literally at our fingertips, we tolerate such malnutrition in our world.

The outrages of hunger are many.  But so, too, are the inspirations of people who confront – and conquer – hunger and malnutrition.  The moms and dads and children, the farmers and fishers, the scientists and activists, the midwives and nutritionists and community health workers.  They provide both the outrage and the inspiration – and the stories of this podcast series.

In this episode, we hear the story of a mother in India who gives birth to a healthy baby girl and, instead of celebration and congratulations, receives a round of condolences.  A narrative from The First 1,000 Days book.

About

The Global Food and Agriculture Program aims to inform the development of US policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the US Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

The Global Food and Agriculture Program is housed within the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. The Council on Global Affairs convenes leading global voices and conducts independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

Support for the Global Food and Agriculture Program is generously provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Blogroll

1,000 Days Blog, 1,000 Days

Africa Can End Poverty, World Bank

Agrilinks Blog

Bread Blog, Bread for the World

Can We Feed the World Blog, Agriculture for Impact

Concern Blogs, Concern Worldwide

Institute Insights, Bread for the World Institute

End Poverty in South Asia, World Bank

Global Development Blog, Center for Global Development

The Global Food Banking Network

Harvest 2050, Global Harvest Initiative

The Hunger and Undernutrition Blog, Humanitas Global Development

International Food Policy Research Institute News, IFPRI

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center Blog, CIMMYT

ONE Blog, ONE Campaign

One Acre Fund Blog, One Acre Fund

Overseas Development Institute Blog, Overseas Development Institute

Oxfam America Blog, Oxfam America

Preventing Postharvest Loss, ADM Institute

Sense & Sustainability Blog, Sense & Sustainability

WFP USA Blog, World Food Program USA

Archive













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