July 22, 2019 | By Hattie Brown

Next Generation 2019 – Addressing Water Security through Increased Access to Investment

The Chicago Council on Global Affairs is pleased to present the 2019 Next Generation Delegates blog series. This year’s Delegation was comprised of 20 outstanding students from universities across the United States and around the world studying agriculture, food, and related disciplines. We were thrilled to feature these emerging leaders at the Global Food Security Symposium 2019, and look forward to sharing the exciting work of this extraordinary group.

This year’s Global Food Security Symposium, Managing Water for a Nutritious Food Future, left me thinking about the ways that we as professionals in the concentric areas of agriculture, nutrition, food security, and international development can be deliberate and strategic about our contribution to mitigating water scarcity.

From the wide array of organizations represented at the Symposium it is clear that there are countless ways to approach water scarcity through economic development. As an impact investing fellow, I found Recommendation II of the 2019 report From Scarcity to Security: Managing Water for a Nutritious Food Future a compelling means to address the issue. The recommendation, among four aimed at various stakeholders within governments, NGOs, and the private sector, is to “ease the challenges that hinder greater private-sector investment to expand sustainable water development for food and nutrition security.”

The report outlines specific recommendations, such as making development finance tools easily accessible to private sector investors, as well as continued investment in digital mapping of water resources and incentives for sharing these data amongst stakeholders. In addition to those actions, development funds devoted to water security projects, such as efficient irrigation and filtration systems, would provide another outlet for innovative solutions, particularly if the funds were administered through an impact investment vehicle.

Impact Investment as a mechanism for improved water security makes intuitive sense. While impact investment often aims to address gaps in economic development, it is challenging to measure the true impact the investment has on its on intended outcome, let alone the anticipated financial return. The potential advantage of water security projects as impact investments are in the “enhanced due diligence,” if you will, as governments are particularly concerned with their water supply for a variety of reasons; as a necessity for daily life, a critical input for agricultural purposes, and a highly valuable commodity.

Impact investment in this realm has the opportunity to forge strategic public-private partnerships and strengthen critical sectors of the economy. For example, investment in small-scale, farmer-led irrigation systems bolsters the agricultural sector in addition to creating more water-efficient systems in food production. Furthermore, water security as an investment prospect makes sense from an environmental, social, and corporate governance perspective, as larger firms aim to diversify their portfolios and mitigate some of the downstream risks associated with water scarcity, pollution, etc.

Investment solutions won’t address all of the problems contributing to water scarcity. However, financial mechanisms in concert with government policy (for example, subsidization of efficient irrigation systems or incentives for conservation practices) have the potential to alleviate some driving factors of scarcity and stimulate true economic development.

About

The Global Food and Agriculture Program aims to inform the development of US policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the US Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

The Global Food and Agriculture Program is housed within the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. The Council on Global Affairs convenes leading global voices and conducts independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

Support for the Global Food and Agriculture Program is generously provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Blogroll

1,000 Days Blog, 1,000 Days

Africa Can End Poverty, World Bank

Agrilinks Blog

Bread Blog, Bread for the World

Can We Feed the World Blog, Agriculture for Impact

Concern Blogs, Concern Worldwide

Institute Insights, Bread for the World Institute

End Poverty in South Asia, World Bank

Global Development Blog, Center for Global Development

The Global Food Banking Network

Harvest 2050, Global Harvest Initiative

The Hunger and Undernutrition Blog, Humanitas Global Development

International Food Policy Research Institute News, IFPRI

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center Blog, CIMMYT

ONE Blog, ONE Campaign

One Acre Fund Blog, One Acre Fund

Overseas Development Institute Blog, Overseas Development Institute

Oxfam America Blog, Oxfam America

Preventing Postharvest Loss, ADM Institute

Sense & Sustainability Blog, Sense & Sustainability

WFP USA Blog, World Food Program USA

Archive

| By Julie Borlaug

Featured Commentary - Hope Through Agriculture: Now More than Ever

In our latest collaboration with Agri-Pulse, Julie Borlaug writes that now is the time for everyone in agriculture to demonstrate how their passion and dedication have found solutions to the major threats we face as a collective human species: food and nutrition security, environmental stability and sustainability.








| By Lisa Moon

Guest Commentary - Reduce Food Loss & Waste, Feed Millions

Studies show that one-third of all food produced for human consumption is lost or wasted, enough to feed 1.9 billion people-almost the same amount as are experiencing food insecurity. Food banks are uniquely positioned to address the paradox of global hunger and food loss and waste. 


| By Colin Christensen, Eva Koehler

Guest Commentary - The Plague You’ve Never Heard About Could be as Destructive as COVID-19: How the Threat from Desert Locusts Shows the Need for Innovations in how Organizations Scale

The international community needs to mobilize to combat the plague of locusts devouring East Africa. At the same time however, we should also consider the long-term investments we must make to build lasting resilience to climate change among smallholder populations.




| By Sarah Bingaman Schwartz, Maria Jones

Guest Commentary - Reducing Food Loss and Waste by Improving Smallholder Storage

Reducing postharvest losses by half would result in enough food to feed a billion people, increase smallholder income levels and minimize pressure on natural resources. The ADM Institute for the Prevention of Postharvest Loss works with smallholders in Bihar to improve storage and reduce loss.