May 6, 2015

Healthy Food for a Healthy World: Accelerating Nutrition

On April 16, The Chicago Council launched a new report, Healthy Food for a Healthy World: Leveraging Agriculture and Food to Improve Global Nutrition, at the Global Food Security Symposium 2015. Each week, we will highlight one of the report’s recommendations in a new post on the Global Food for Thought blog. This blog series will explore how the strengths and ingenuity of the agriculture and food sector can reduce the reality and risks of malnutrition globally. Watch for a new post each Wednesday, and join the discussion using #GlobalAg.

Angel investors and venture capitalists from Silicon Valley to Shanghai are finding ways to invest in food accelerator programs that have the potential to kick-start small- and medium-sized food business that focus on nutrient density or improving access and affordability of healthy foods. This is a unique way for corporations and business to support the work of small and midsize for-profit companies that are trying to improve nutrition.

The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) has pioneered one such model for channeling private-sector entrepreneurship in low- and middle-income countries towards the elimination of global malnutrition through their Marketplace for Nutritious Foods. Through three pilots developed in Mozambique, Kenya, and Tanzania, the Marketplace has helped local entrepreneurs bring nutrition-enhancing innovations to market by providing networking, knowledge sharing and technical and financial assistance.

With the goal of improving access to nutritious foods for low-income consumers, the project serves as a catalyst for innovators and provides donors, investors, and GAIN with investment opportunities. Technical support and initial seed funds help reduce the risks associated with investing in new small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), making them more viable candidates for donor and private-sector investment.

As part of the Marketplace, the Innovation Accelerator program draws on private-sector investment to help budding nutrition-oriented SMEs overcome financing and other barriers to profitability and nutritional impact. Each country’s accelerator requests applications, and winners receive intensive coaching as they develop business plans, which, if accepted, are then brought to life through privately funded grants and loans. Similarly, GAIN works with larger companies to support outgrower schemes that provide technical support and financing to smaller rural producers, allowing them to sell through the large company’s network.

A second component of the Marketplace involves the development of a Community of Practice that brings together a larger group of SMEs with government officials, investors, donors, and academics. This helps build an enabling environment for SMEs to succeed, providing opportunities for networking, additional investment, and training on issues such as food safety, marketing, financing, and quality control.

“The Community of Practice gives us the opportunity to learn more about how to improve and make our business grow,” according to Octávio Muchanga, who is the managing director of a local peanut butter–producing company, Xikhaba, in Mozambique. “We learn about new approaches to position our product and about the importance of nutrition and how we can contribute to improving the nutrition of Mozambicans.”

Through the Marketplace, GAIN has demonstrated the potential for accelerator programs to spur innovation and solve malnutrition issues. The initial programs have been funded by each country’s USAID mission, and the Marketplace teams collaborate to provide entrepreneurial and technical assistance in support of relevant USAID programs. In addition to the potential for donor investment, these accelerator programs also provide significant opportunity for private-sector investment by reducing the risk of investing in SMEs. With the provision of business services, investment opportunities, and informal networking, successful SMEs emerge as sustainable firms with high-growth potential.
 
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About

The Global Food and Agriculture Program aims to inform the development of US policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the US Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

The Global Food and Agriculture Program is housed within the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. The Council on Global Affairs convenes leading global voices and conducts independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

Support for the Global Food and Agriculture Program is generously provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Blogroll

1,000 Days Blog, 1,000 Days

Africa Can End Poverty, World Bank

Agrilinks Blog

Bread Blog, Bread for the World

Can We Feed the World Blog, Agriculture for Impact

Concern Blogs, Concern Worldwide

Institute Insights, Bread for the World Institute

End Poverty in South Asia, World Bank

Global Development Blog, Center for Global Development

The Global Food Banking Network

Harvest 2050, Global Harvest Initiative

The Hunger and Undernutrition Blog, Humanitas Global Development

International Food Policy Research Institute News, IFPRI

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center Blog, CIMMYT

ONE Blog, ONE Campaign

One Acre Fund Blog, One Acre Fund

Overseas Development Institute Blog, Overseas Development Institute

Oxfam America Blog, Oxfam America

Preventing Postharvest Loss, ADM Institute

Sense & Sustainability Blog, Sense & Sustainability

WFP USA Blog, World Food Program USA

Archive


Commentary - Addressing Food Security Beyond our Food Supply

I’ll soon be attending the Symposium on Agriculture and Food Security. It doesn’t happen often that world leaders, researchers and philanthropists have the chance to gather for two days to discuss the progress made in the past year – and the work that’s still ahead – in addressing food security challenges.






Commentary - Stretching the Food Aid Dollar by Building Strong Local Markets

Floods, typhoons and droughts. Market fluctuations and inflation. Unhealthy government transitions and local political flare-ups. Disease-ridden crops and tainted water sources. All of these shocks can devastate any country, but for nations combatting poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, disasters often precipitate acute food security outbreaks that result in suffering and loss of life. 


Commentary - What Would Norm Say?

Given the decade-long relationship I had with him in building the World Food Prize, I am sometimes asked about what the late Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Norman E. Borlaug might say about a particular topic.






Commentary - Freezing the Footprint of Food

By the year 2050, our planet will be home to another two billion people. How and where we will we feed everyone has become one of the most pressing conservation issues of the 21st century.



Commentary - Lesson from a Famine: Markets Matter

Ten years after the Ethiopian famine of 2003, when international food aid rushed in to feed 14 million people, another World Food Program (WFP) tent has been erected on an open field.  But this isn’t a scene of food distribution.  It is a scene of food purchase.