April 4, 2019

Featured Commentary - We Must Invest in Global Nutrition and End the Need for Foreign Aid

Editor's Note: Agri-Pulse and The Chicago Council on Global Affairs are teaming up to host a monthly column to explore how the US agriculture and food sector can maintain its competitive edge and advance food security in an increasingly integrated and dynamic world.

 

What has happened in virtually an instant in the context of human history is truly astounding. In the past 25 years, our world has cut hunger, poverty, and malnutrition in half and lifted a billion people out of poverty. Over our lifetimes, conditions in the world have improved by virtually every measure. Personally, I believe these facts and figures are among the most striking indications that God is moving in our time. As someone who comes from a long line of farmers and grocers, I also know American farmers have been a central driver of this global progress, putting affordable food on the world’s tables and keeping our country running.

However, the more recent news has been alarming. Global hunger is on the rise for the third year in a row. The number of undernourished people globally increased to nearly 821 million in 2017, up from around 804 million in 2016. Malnutrition remains the underlying cause of nearly 50 percent of childhood deaths, killing 3.1 million children under five every year—more than malaria, tuberculsosis and HIV/AIDS combined. Moreover, if children do not receive the necessary micro and macro nutrients in the first 1,000 days of life, from conception through their second birthday, the development of their brains and their bodies is permanently stunted, a condition that affects 1 in 3 people on earth. It is robing billions of individuals of their ability to grow into their full potential, leeching our world of critical human capital, reducing national GDPs by as much as 12 percent, and making entire portions of the globe more vulnerable to shocks and instability.

 

>>>Read the full article on Agri-Pulse

About

The Global Food and Agriculture Program aims to inform the development of US policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the US Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

The Global Food and Agriculture Program is housed within the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, an independent, nonpartisan organization that provides insight – and influences the public discourse – on critical global issues. The Council on Global Affairs convenes leading global voices and conducts independent research to bring clarity and offer solutions to challenges and opportunities across the globe. The Council is committed to engaging the public and raising global awareness of issues that transcend borders and transform how people, business, and governments engage the world.

Support for the Global Food and Agriculture Program is generously provided by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Blogroll

1,000 Days Blog, 1,000 Days

Africa Can End Poverty, World Bank

Agrilinks Blog

Bread Blog, Bread for the World

Can We Feed the World Blog, Agriculture for Impact

Concern Blogs, Concern Worldwide

Institute Insights, Bread for the World Institute

End Poverty in South Asia, World Bank

Global Development Blog, Center for Global Development

The Global Food Banking Network

Harvest 2050, Global Harvest Initiative

The Hunger and Undernutrition Blog, Humanitas Global Development

International Food Policy Research Institute News, IFPRI

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center Blog, CIMMYT

ONE Blog, ONE Campaign

One Acre Fund Blog, One Acre Fund

Overseas Development Institute Blog, Overseas Development Institute

Oxfam America Blog, Oxfam America

Preventing Postharvest Loss, ADM Institute

Sense & Sustainability Blog, Sense & Sustainability

WFP USA Blog, World Food Program USA

Archive



Commentary - Food security beyond calories

In my role as Chairman of the world’s largest nutrition, health and wellness company, I know that changing the global food security agenda will take time, require a clear understanding of all the dimensions of the challenge – as well as the linkages between them. And it will also require an equally clear understanding of where targets may be conflicting.


Commentary - The Future of Food Aid

Earlier this week, I attended the Chicago Council’s Symposium on Agriculture and Food Security, and for the second year in a row heard from experts in the fight against hunger.




Commentary - From Dairy Farm to the Global Table

I was fortunate to be in attendance as the Chicago Council on Global Affairs released their new report, “Advancing Global Food Security: The Power of Science, Trade, and Business” at the 2013 Global Food Security Symposium.


Live Blog - Chicago Council: Agriculture and Health Nexus Panel

“How many enemies can I make on this answer?” Dr. Shapiro boldly called for large agribusinesses like Monsanto, Syngenta, and DuPont to make all their information public and readily available. Dr. Shapiro criticized these companies for not being entirely honest about their goals and motivations.



Commentary - Addressing Food Security Beyond our Food Supply

I’ll soon be attending the Symposium on Agriculture and Food Security. It doesn’t happen often that world leaders, researchers and philanthropists have the chance to gather for two days to discuss the progress made in the past year – and the work that’s still ahead – in addressing food security challenges.






Commentary - Stretching the Food Aid Dollar by Building Strong Local Markets

Floods, typhoons and droughts. Market fluctuations and inflation. Unhealthy government transitions and local political flare-ups. Disease-ridden crops and tainted water sources. All of these shocks can devastate any country, but for nations combatting poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, disasters often precipitate acute food security outbreaks that result in suffering and loss of life.