Meet the New South Korea

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Meet the New South Korea

August 25, 2015

South Korea is no longer sitting back and absorbing North Korea's provocations. A look at attitudes on identity and reunification among South Korea's youth suggests that in the future this will become the norm, not the exception.

| By Karl Friedhoff

Meet the New South Korea

South Korea is no longer sitting back and absorbing North Korea's provocations. A look at attitudes on identity and reunification among South Korea's youth suggests that in the future this will become the norm, not the exception.


| By Craig Kafura

The Politics of the Iran Deal

Republicans have come out strongly against the Iran nuclear deal, and have also used it to slam their biggest Democratic rival for 2016, Hillary Clinton. But is the deal actually a problem for Clinton?





About

Dina Smeltz joined The Chicago Council on Global Affairs in February 2012 as a senior fellow in public opinion and foreign policy, and directed the Council’s 2012 survey of American public opinion (see Foreign Policy in the New Millennium).  She has nearly 20 years of experience in designing and fielding international social, political and foreign policy surveys.

As the director of research in the Middle East and South Asia division (2001-2007) and analyst/director of the European division (1992-2004) in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research at the US State Department’s Office of Research, Dina conducted over a hundred surveys in these regions and regularly briefed senior government officials on key research findings. Her experience includes mass public and elite surveys as well as qualitative research.  She has written numerous policy-relevant reports on Arab, Muslim and South Asian regional attitudes toward political, economic, social and foreign policy issues.  Her writing also includes policy briefs and reports on the post-1989 political transitions in Central and Eastern Europe, and European attitudes toward a wide range foreign policy issues including globalization, European integration, immigration, NATO, and European security.

With a special emphasis research in post-conflict situations (informally referred to as a “combat pollster”), Dina has worked with research teams in Bosnia, Kosovo, Cyprus, Israel-Palestinian Territories and in Iraq (2003-2005), where she was one of the few people on the ground who could accurately report average Iraqis impressions of the postwar situation.  In the past three years, Dina has consulted for several NGOs and research organizations on projects spanning women’s development in Afghanistan, civil society in Egypt and evaluating voter education efforts in Iraq.

Dina has an MA from the University of Michigan and a BS from Pennsylvania State University.

Feel free to email Dina with comments or questions at dsmeltz@thechicagocouncil.org

Archive

| By Karl Friedhoff

Meet the New South Korea

South Korea is no longer sitting back and absorbing North Korea's provocations. A look at attitudes on identity and reunification among South Korea's youth suggests that in the future this will become the norm, not the exception.


| By Craig Kafura

The Politics of the Iran Deal

Republicans have come out strongly against the Iran nuclear deal, and have also used it to slam their biggest Democratic rival for 2016, Hillary Clinton. But is the deal actually a problem for Clinton?





| By Craig Kafura

Americans Support Ending Cuba Trade Embargo

As the United States and Cuba continue to work towards a normalization of the relationship, results from the new 2015 Chicago Council Survey show that Americans favor lifting the trade embargo on Cuba and believe the proposed changes in US-Cuba relations will benefit both countries.







| By Craig Kafura

The Republican Divide on Immigration

There are over a dozen Republican candidates in the running for their party's nomination, whether or not they've formally announced. On most topics, they present a unified front—but immigration has proven to be a far more divisive topic.