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"The First 1,000 Days" Is Coming May 3

February 4, 2016

Roger Thurow's new book, The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and ChildrenAnd the World, is a narrative journey through the 1,000 days from the beginning of a mother’s pregnancy to the second birthday of her child. The book is set for release on May 3, pre-order is now available.

| By Roger Thurow

"The First 1,000 Days" Is Coming May 3

Roger Thurow's new book, The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and ChildrenAnd the World, is a narrative journey through the 1,000 days from the beginning of a mother’s pregnancy to the second birthday of her child.






Archive

| By Roger Thurow

"The First 1,000 Days" Is Coming May 3

Roger Thurow's new book, The First 1,000 Days: A Crucial Time for Mothers and ChildrenAnd the World, is a narrative journey through the 1,000 days from the beginning of a mother’s pregnancy to the second birthday of her child. The book is set for release on May 3, pre-order is now available.








| By Roger Thurow

A Christmas Miracle—Almost

The House of Representatives had brought us to the edge of a Christmas miracle by passing legislation giving statutory authorization to Feed the Future, writes Senior Fellow Roger Thurow


| By Roger Thurow

Starvation in a World of Plenty

On November 18, Senior Fellow Roger Thurow received the University of Iowa International Impact Award in recognition of his efforts in public health awareness.


| By Roger Thurow

Lunchtime in Uganda

Senior Fellow Roger Thurow reports on nutrition in northern Uganda for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.





| By Roger Thurow

The Last Hunger Season, Part 4 – One Acre Fund’s Disruptive Thinking

It is Africa’s cruelest irony that her hungriest people are her smallholder farmers. For decades, development orthodoxy had prioritized feeding hungry farmers with emergency food aid rather than improving their farming with long-term agriculture development aid so they wouldn’t be hungry in the first place.



Resources

Invest in Maternal and Newborn Health

Iodizing Salt Helping Women and Kids in Pakistan

Maternal Anemia

Stunting: The Goal

Average Incidence of Low Birth Weight by UN Subregion

Ending Newborn Deaths

Child and Maternal Nutrition

What Causes Maternal and Child Malnutrition?

Guatamala's Malnutrition Crisis

What Causes Maternal and Child Malnutrition?

The Life of an African Child

Solving the World's Challenges

Prevention of Stunting in Latin America

Stunting in Children

Hidden Hunger Life Cycle

Preventing Maternal and Child Undernutrition

1,000 Days Window

World Map Stunting Prevalence

World Map Low Infant Birth Weight Prevalence

World Map Prevalence of Anemia in Children

Nutrition- Scaling it Up

Economic Growth is a Double-Edged Sword for Nutrition

Three Measures of Hunger

Meat per Person

Vitamin A Sweet Potato

Break the Cycle of Stunting

6 Nutrients to Nourish Mothers and Children

Child Mortality Numbers

All Mothers Created Equal

Malnutrition Facts

Det of Child MalCrit of Diet

Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission

Fortifying Foods to Prevent Diseases

Simple Tools to Save the Lives of Mothers and Children

Nutrition- Scaling it Up Children

What Causes Maternal and Child Malnutrition

Preventing Stunting

Vitamin Intake Gap

Future Food Fortification

Ways to Obtain Micronutrients

Vitamins' Function and Foods

Vitamins During Pregnancy

Preventing Stunting

People Living on Less Than $1.25 Per Day

Global Hunger Index 2012

Global Hunger

Global Food Revolution

Teach a Woman to Farm

Measuring African Agriculture

Global Food Expenditure

Innovations to Help African Farmers Thrive

Growing Better Rice for a Hungry World

Solving the World's Challenges, Nutrition Top Priority

Hunger Facts

Cash Transfers

Biodiversity

Trends in U5 Underweight Rates by Region

How to Fight Hunger (Research Advancements)

Rise of Food Prices

The Female Face of Farming

The Global State of Agriculture

8 Biotech Common Crops

Ethiopia on the Path from Famine to Food Security

The Life of an Indian Girl

5 Keys to Safer Food

Family Planning Saves Lives

Why Invest in Women

 

 

1,000 Days Project

Roger Thurow’s next book will tell the story of the vital importance of proper nutrition and health care in the 1,000 days window from the beginning of a woman’s pregnancy to her child’s second birthday.

The 1,000 days period is the crucial period of development, when malnutrition can have severe life-long impacts on the individual, the family and society as a whole. Nutritional deficiencies that occur during this time are often overlooked, resulting in a hidden hunger. It is a problem of great human and economic dimensions, impacting rich and poor countries alike.

Roger will follow small groups of women and their children in four parts of the world – India, Uganda, Guatemala and the United States – through the 1,000 days period.  He also will examine the innovations, the economics and the politics of malnutrition and hunger.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is providing support for Thurow’s writing, including his multimedia storytelling via blog posts and video.  The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting also is supporting Thurow’s international reporting and storytelling during the first year of the book project.


Guatemala

Guatemala is classified by the World Bank as a lower-middle income country. Over half the population lives below the national poverty line. UNDP classifies Guatemala as a country with medium human development. The government spends only 6.7% of its GDP on health expenditure (with WHO recommendations at 15%). The country’s health indicators (such as infant mortality rate and U5 mortality) rate at 24 and 30 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively are slightly better than the world’s average. However, Guatemala ranks country number thirty-three on the global hunger index, classifying it as a country with serious hunger issues. It has the fourth highest chronic malnutrition in the world and the highest in Latin America and the Caribbean. In some indigenous areas almost seventy percent of the population is chronically malnourished according to U.S. International Agency for International Development.

Helpful data:

  • Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (World Bank 2012): $3,120
  • Percent of population living below $2 a day (PRB 2011): 26%
  • Poverty gap at national poverty line (World Bank 2011): 53.7%
  • Infant Mortality Rate (World Bank 2011): 24
  • Under 5 Mortality Rate (World Bank 2011): 30
  • Health expenditure as % of total GDP (World Bank 2011): 6.7%
  • Global Hunger Index Ranking (IFPRI 2012): #33
  • Human Development Ranking (UNDP 2012): #133
     

Additional resources:


India

India is classified by the World Bank as a lower-middle income country. Over three-fourths of the population lives on less than two dollars per day. UNDP classifies India as a country with medium human development. The government spends only 3.9% of its GDP on health expenditure (with WHO recommendations at 15%). The country’s health indicators (such as infant mortality rate and U5 mortality) rate at 47 and 61 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively are worse than the world’s average. India ranks number sixty five on the global hunger index, classifying it as a country with alarming hunger issues. Although the country has recently progressed, over forty percent of children fewer than five years of age are malnourished.

Helpful data:

  • Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (World Bank 2012): $1,530
  • Percent of population living below $2 a day (PRB 2011): 76%
  • Poverty gap at national poverty line (World Bank 2010): 29.8%
  • Infant Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 47
  • Under 5 Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 61
  • Health expenditure as % of total GDP (World Bank 2011): 3.9%
  • Global Hunger Index Ranking (IFPRI 2012): #65
  • Human Development Ranking (UNDP 2012): #136
     

Additional resources:


Uganda

Uganda is classified by the World Bank as a low-income country. Almost two-thirds of the population lives on less than two dollars a day. UNDP classifies Uganda as a country with low human development. The government spends 9.5% of its GDP on health expenditure (with WHO recommendations at 15%). The country’s health indicators (such as infant mortality rate and U5 mortality) rate at 58 and 90 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively are much worse than the world’s average. Uganda ranks country number forty-two on the global hunger index, classifying it as a country with serious hunger issues.

Helpful data:

  • Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (World Bank 2012): $440
  • Percent of population living below $2 a day (PRB 2011): 65%
  • Poverty gap at national poverty line (World Bank 2011): 24.5%
  • Infant Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 58
  • Under 5 Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 90
  • Health expenditure as % of total GDP (World Bank 2011): 9.5%
  • Global Hunger Index Ranking (IFPRI 2012): #42
  • Human Development Ranking (UNDP 2012): #161
     

Additional resources:


United States

The United States is classified by the World Bank as a high income country. UNDP classifies it as a country with very high human development (the third highest in the world). The government spends 17.9% of its GDP on health expenditure (with WHO recommendations at 15%). The country’s health indicators (such as infant mortality rate and U5 mortality) rate at 6.4 and 7.5 deaths per 1,000 live births respectively are much better than the world’s average. The United States is not ranked on the global hunger index, classifying it as a country without hunger

Helpful data:

  • Gross National Income (GNI) per capita (World Bank 2012): $50,120
  • Infant Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 6.4
  • Under 5 Mortality Rate per 1,000 live births (World Bank 2011): 7.5
  • Health expenditure as % of total GDP (World Bank 2011): 17.9%
  • Global Hunger Index Ranking (IFPRI 2012): not ranked
  • Human Development Ranking (UNDP 2012): #3
     

Additional resources:

 

The Last Hunger Season

Africa’s small farmers, who comprise two-thirds of its population, toil in a time warp, living and working essentially as they did in the 1930s. Without mechanized equipment, fertilizer, or irrigation; using primitive storage facilities, roads, and markets; lacking capital, credit, and insurance; they harvest only one-quarter the yields of Western farmers, half of which spoil before getting to market. But in 2011 one group of farmers in Kenya came together to try to change their odds for success—and their families’ futures. Roger Thurow spent a year following their progress.

In The Last Hunger Season, the intimate dramas of the farmers’ lives unfold amidst growing awareness that to feed the world’s growing population, food production must double by 2050. How will the farmers, Africa, and a hungrier world deal with issues of water usage, land ownership, foreign investment, corruption, GMO’s, the changing role of women, and the politics of foreign aid?

Order The Last Hunger Season on Amazon.com.

Families

The Last Hunger Season tells the story of four farmers in western Kenya—Leonida Wanyama, Rasoa Wasike, Zipporah Biketi, and Francis Wanjala—and their efforts to put an end to the hunger season. Learn more about their lives, families, and struggles and aspirations
 

Videos

This section features The Last Hunger Season documentary film trailer by Courter Films & Associates, video clips featuring smallholder farmers in Kenya, and Roger Thurow’s book discussion videos and speeches.

 

Media Coverage

See media coverage and interviews with Roger Thurow about his book, The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change.


Families

Zipporah Biketi

Zipporah Biketi is a 31 year old mother of four from the village of Kabuchai in western Kenya, where she lives with her husband, Sanet, who is in the animal trading business.
 

Francis Mamati

Francis Mamati is a 54 year old maize farmer from the village of Kabuchai in western Kenya, where he lives with his wife Mary and their nine children. His main goal is educating his children to lift them from poverty.
 

Leonida Wanyama

Leonida Wanyama is a 43 year old farmer and village elder from the Lutacho village in western Kenya. Her husband, Peter, was injured in a traffic accident many years ago; thus, she completely supports her seven children with food and education.
 

Rasoa Wasike

Rasoa Wasike is a 31 year old mother of three young boys from the village of Kabuchai in western Kenya. She is a small-holder farmer and an upcoming entrepreneur as she invested in a calf to eventually pay for her son’s education.

 


Videos

The Last Hunger Season Multi-Part Series

 

Documentary Film Trailer by Courter Films & Associates

 

The Last Hunger Season – Faith Video Series by One Campaign

 

Book Discussions and Speeches
 

Roger Thurow’s TedxChange at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

 

The Last Hunger Season Book Discussion at the Center for Strategic and International Studies

 

Setting the Stage: One Billion Hungry. Can we Feed the World Sustainably?

 


Media Coverage
 

Interviews

Take Note: Hunger in an Age of Plenty
Roger Thurow’s Interview with WPSU’s Kate Lao Shaffner, February 2014

  Roger Thurow’s Interview with Tom Paulson at Humanosphere, April 2013

 

Book Reviews

The Last Hunger Season: When Will It Come?, Bread for the World, May 29, 2013

The Last Hunger Season: Study Guide and Quotes, Opportunity International, May 2013

The Last Hunger Season, One Billion Hungry, April 26, 2013

One Book One Northwestern: Last Hunger Season, Northwestern University, April 8, 2013

University Announces hoice for Next One Book One Northwestern, The Daily Northwestern, April 8, 2013

Out of Africa, Harvard Business Review, November 2012

The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change By Roger Thurow, Washington Post, September 7, 2012

The Last Hunger Season: A Year in an African Farm Community on the Brink of Change, Philanthropy News Digest, November 29, 2012

The Last Hunger Season, Acumen, August 8, 2012

The Last Hunger Season, Financial Times, July 22, 2012

The Last Hunger Season: How an NGO is Raising African Crop Yields, The National, May 26, 2012

The Last Hunger Season, USGLC, May 18, 2012

Enough

For more than forty years, humankind has had the knowledge, tools, and resources to end chronic hunger worldwide. Yet at the start of the twenty-first century, 25,000 people a day—and nearly six million children a year—die of hunger, malnutrition, and related diseases. Malnutrition kills more Africans than AIDS and malaria combined. We in the West tend to think of famine as a natural disaster, brought about by drought; or as the legacy of war and corrupt leaders. But Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman, award-winning writers on Africa, development, and agriculture, see famine as the result of bad policies spanning the political spectrum. In this compelling investigative narrative, they explain through vivid human stories how the agricultural revolutions that transformed Asia and Latin America stopped short in Africa, and how our sometimes well-intentioned strategies—alternating with ignorance and neglect—have conspired to keep the world’s poorest people hungry and unable to feed themselves.

And they argue passionately and convincingly that this generation is the one that could finally end the scourge that has haunted the human race since its beginning.

Order Enough on Amazon.

Authors

Roger Thurow was a Wall Street Journal foreign correspondent for twenty years and has reported from more than sixty countries, including two dozen in Africa. Scott Kilman covered agriculture at the Journal for two decades. In 2005, Thurow and Kilman were honored by the United Nations for their reporting on humanitarian and development issues.

Audio

Authors Roger Thurow and Scott Kilman discuss global hunger along with a panel of distinguished experts.
 

 

Videos

Scott Kilman and Roger Thurow at 2010 Chicago Tribune Printers Row Lit Fest


Roger Thurow at Opportunity International Spring 2010 Microfinance Conference


Scott Kilman and Roger Thurow at Google program


Roger Thurow at Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa Event